A service dog puts her many impressive skills on display in this adorable video.

Comedian Drew Lynch thinks his service dog, Stella, is amazing.

Which is why he recently put together this short video showing all the ways she helps him throughout the day.


Image by TheDrewLynch/Twitter, used with permission.

The help provided by service dogs like Stella — not to mention the friendship — is immeasurable.

The thousands of service dogs working in the U.S. do a lot more than you might think.

When we see service dogs out in public, casually guiding their human through public spaces, we don't always stop to consider just how smart these dogs really are or appreciate that they are trained to do so much more than meets the eye.

Image by TheDrewLynch/Twitter, used with permission.

These dogs are trained for much more than helping people with vision or hearing impairments.

They can work with people who use powered or manual wheelchairs, have various types of autism, or are prone to seizures. They can also alert people to other complications, like low blood sugar. According to the National Service Animal Registry, you can qualify for a service dog if you have any condition that limits your daily physical activity.

Although Drew didn't specify why he has a service dog, he did joke on "America's Got Talent" that the state of California gave him one because of his stutter.

Check out Lynch's adorable video showcasing Stella's many talents and busy life:


Courtesy of FIELDTRIP
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Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
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