Daniel Radcliffe's emotional tribute to Alan Rickman contains a lesson for all of us.

Even among the hundreds of incredible, moving tributes to Alan Rickman that were penned after the actor's death was announced this morning, Daniel Radcliffe's really stands out.

Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images.


The "Harry Potter" star argues that Rickman's single greatest trait was not his immense talent (although, yes, also his talent), but the utterly respectful and generous way he treated those who looked up to him.

Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images.

Here's what Radcliffe wrote (emphasis mine):

"Alan Rickman is undoubtedly one of the greatest actors I will ever work with. He is also, one of the loyalest and most supportive people I've ever met in the film industry. He was so encouraging of me both on set and in the years post-Potter. I'm pretty sure he came and saw everything I ever did on stage both in London and New York. He didn't have to do that. I know other people who've been friends with him for much much longer than I have and they all say 'if you call Alan, it doesn't matter where in the world he is or how busy he is with what he's doing, he'll get back to you within a day'.

People create perceptions of actors based on the parts they played so it might surprise some people to learn that contrary to some of the sterner (or downright scary) characters he played, Alan was extremely kind, generous, self-deprecating and funny. And certain things obviously became even funnier when delivered in his unmistakable double-bass.

As an actor he was one of the first of the adults on Potter to treat me like a peer rather than a child. Working with him at such a formative age was incredibly important and I will carry the lessons he taught me for the rest of my life and career. Film sets and theatre stages are all far poorer for the loss of this great actor and man."



Rickman didn't have to be a good dude. But he was — by choice.

Photo by Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images.

Even though Radcliffe was, nominally, the star of "Harry Potter," and Rickman played a supporting role (albeit a critical one), back in 2001, Radcliffe was a mostly untested, 11-year-old kid who had never been in much of anything, and Rickman was ... already kind of a big deal.

It would have been easy for the veteran actor to be condescending, impatient, or arrogant. It would have been even easier to simply ignore the kids on set.

Instead, Radcliffe insists, Rickman went out of his way to be a mentor and treat his younger co-stars with respect.

There's a big lesson for most of us in Radcliffe's eulogy.

Image by Amber Rae/Flickr (altered).

Pretty much every single one of us regularly interacts with at least one person who looks up to us. Maybe it's your child, niece, or nephew. Maybe it's a younger sibling. Maybe it's a student. Maybe it's your college-aged intern, or an entry-level employee in your office. Maybe it's someone just starting out in your field seeking professional guidance.

Don't be a jerk. People remember.

Instead, be kind. Be generous. Be patient. Even when it's easier not to be.

That's what really stays with people. Even long after you're gone.

More

Los Angeles is experiencing a homeless epidemic that was years in the making.

Over the past six years, the unhoused population in the city has risen 75 percent. The city's lack of homeless shelters and affordable housing has forced many who can't afford L.A.'s sky-high rents to live on the streets.

According to LAist, since 2000, renter incomes have decreased by 3 percent while rents have gone up 32 percent.

While the city has launched a $100 million-per-year program to help the problem, rapper, entrepreneur, and actor Jaden Smith has found his own way of responding to the crisis: love.

Keep Reading Show less
Communities

Mom and blogger Mary Katherine Backstrom regularly shares snippets of life with her two children on her Facebook page. One particularly touching interaction with her daughter is melting hearts and blowing minds due to the three-year-old's wise words about forgiveness.

Even adults struggle with the concept of forgiveness. Entire books have been written about how and why to forgive those who have wronged us, but many still have a hard time getting it. Who would guess that a preschooler could encapsulate what forgiveness means in a handful of innocent words?

Keep Reading Show less
Family


Social media may be "ruining society" according to a lot of people's grandparents. But it's also a pretty helpful tool for spotting racists and publicly shaming them. Incidentally, a lot of those racists are also people's grandparents... kinda makes you think, hmmm?

Recently, two elderly white ladies were spotted in a Burger King in Central Florida being racist towards a man who they overheard speaking Spanish. That man turned out to be the manager.

Some nearby customers were filming the incident and posted the video online where it's gone viral. "Go back to Mexico," says one of the women. "If you want to keep speaking Spanish, go back to your Mexican country." She then continues: "this is America. Our main language is English. ... Speak your Mexican at home."

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

The U.S. women's soccer team won the Women's World Cup, but the victory is marred by the fact that the team is currently fighting for equal pay. In soccer, the game is won by scoring points, but the fight for equal pay isn't as clearly winnable and the playing field isn't as even.

We live in a world where winning the World Cup is easier than winning equal pay, but co-captain Megan Rapinoe says there's one easy way fans can support the team: Go see games.

Some people argue the men's team deserves to get paid more because they are more successful and earn more money for the United States Soccer Federation. Pay depends on merchandise and ticket sales, and in general, men's sporting events tend to draw a bigger crowd than women's sporting events. It's not about sex, many argue; it's about the fact that people just prefer to see men play.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture