Dana Carvey's Joe Biden impersonation is so perfect he should be back on 'SNL'
via Joe Biden / Flickr

Let's face it, "Saturday Night Live" nailed it when they chose Alec Baldwin to play Donald Trump on the show, but they missed the mark casting Jim Carrey as Joe Biden. Carrey's Biden was all-over-the-map, sometimes he was a doddering old man, other times he bounced around, making finger guns and acting like a 1930's brawler.

This season, Carrey was replaced by cast member Alex Moffat and the results, so far, haven't been very memorable. In the past, Jason Sudeikis, Woody Harrelson, John Mulaney, and Kevin Nealon have all taken a shot at playing Biden on "SNL."



Former "SNL" cast member Dana Carvey appears to have found the secret sauce to impersonating Biden and it's so good that he should return to the show as the president.

Why not?

Maya Rudolph rejoined the cast to play Kamala Harris. Carvey was probably best known on 'SNL' for his impersonation of George H.W. Bush which was the gold standard during his presidency.

He also famously played the Church Lady and Garth on "Wayne's World."

Carvey debuted his Biden impersonation on "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert" on Tuesday. Carvey says his impersonation is the one you see at a town hall. That's the more empathetic version of Biden that we've seen a lot of since the COVID-19 outbreak.

"I do him at the town hall when he's like the gentle father to the country and he looks like the alien who came off the spaceship in 'Close Encounters of the Third Kind,'" Carvey explained to host Colbert. He also peppers in Biden's unique ability to lose his train of thought mid-sentence.

"Folks, c'mon. Folks, let's get real here. You know, we've got to do the thing," Carvey said while squinting his eyes. "We did with Barack, we did the deal. And, you know, my dad, you know, lost his job in Scranton. No joke! No joke, I'm not being a wise guy here. I said, 'Pops, why did you lose it?' He said, 'Joe, I did.' My mom said, 'That's the cookie that crumbles."

People contain multitudes, so the best impersonators seem to focus on one aspect of their subject's personality. Carvey's approach is similar to the one taken by master Trump impersonator James Austin Johnson, who focuses on Trump's behavior at rallies. His initial attempts at impersonating Trump targeted his bigotry, but he soon realized that that's more bothersome than funny to most.

Carvey also did his Dr. Anthony Fauci impersonation on the episode. To Carvey, Fauci comes off as "kind of a tough guy." Here, he imagines what a conversation between Fauci and Paul McCartney would sound like.


True

When Molly Reeser was a student at Michigan State University, she took a job mucking horse stalls to help pay for classes. While she was there, she met a 10-year-old girl named Casey, who was being treated for cancer, and — because both were animal lovers — they became fast friends.

Two years later, Casey died of cancer.

"Everyone at the barn wanted to do something to honor her memory," Molly remembers. A lot of suggestions were thrown out, but Molly knew that there was a bigger, more enduring way to do it.

"I saw firsthand how horses helped Casey and her family escape from the difficult and terrifying times they were enduring. I knew that there must be other families who could benefit from horses in the way she and her family had."

Molly approached the barn owners and asked if they would be open to letting her hold a one-day event. She wanted to bring pediatric cancer patients to the farm, where they could enjoy the horses and peaceful setting. They agreed, and with the help of her closest friends and the "emergency" credit card her parents had given her, Molly created her first Camp Casey. She worked with the local hospital where Casey had been a patient and invited 20 patients, their siblings and their parents.

The event was a huge success — and it was originally meant to be just that: a one-day thing. But, Molly says, "I believe Casey had other plans."

One week after the event, Molly received a letter from a five-year-old boy who had brain cancer. He had been at Camp Casey and said it was "the best day of his life."

"[After that], I knew that we had to pull it off again," Molly says. And they did. Every month for the next few years, they threw a Camp Casey. And when Molly graduated, she did the most terrifying thing she had ever done and told her parents that she would be waitressing for a year to see if it might be possible to turn Camp Casey into an actual nonprofit organization. That year of waitressing turned into six, but in the end she was able to pull it off: by 2010, Camp Casey became a non-profit with a paid staff.

"I am grateful for all the ways I've experienced good luck in my life and, therefore, I believe I have a responsibility to give back. It brings me tremendous joy to see people, animals, or things coming together to create goodness in a world that can often be filled with hardships."

Camp Casey serves 1500 children under the age of 18 each year in Michigan. "The organization looks different than when it started," Molly says. "We now operate four cost-free programs that bring accessible horseback riding and recreational services to children with cancer, sickle cell disease, and other life-threatening illnesses."

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