Colin Jost shares his mom's sneaky attempts to get him and Scar Jo to change their baby's name
via Wikimedia Commons and Late Night with Seth Meyers

Colin Jost and Scarlett Johansson

SNL "Weekend Update" host Colin Jost and his wife actor Scarlett Johansson welcomed a baby into this world in August. The high-profile, private couple was able to keep news of the pregnancy relatively quiet until Jost announced it the day before the baby was born.

The couple was married in October 2020. Cosmo is Jost's first child and their first as a couple. Johansson is already mom to daughter Rose, 6, who she shares with French journalist Romain Dauriac.

Jost announced the baby's arrival on Instagram where he couldn't waste the opportunity to take a jab at his "Weekend Update" co-host, Michael Che. He jokingly said to refer any questions to his publicist @chethinks, Che's Instagram account.



Like many creative types, Jost and Johansson chose a name that's a little quirky and uncommon. In fact, the name hasn't been a popular American baby name in the past 100 years.

Cosmo hasn't appeared in the top 1000 U.S. baby names since 1926. However, it'll probably make a comeback in the coming years after being chosen by celebrity parents.

Appellation Mountain says the name Cosmo has a "quirky, not-quite-real quality," that could be why it was revealed as the first name of Kramer on "Seinfeld" in 1995.

Jost was on "Late Night with Seth Meyers" on Thursday where he revealed that his mother wasn't really on board with the name and did everything she could to have it changed without seeming too pushy.

Colin Jost Reveals Why He Named His Baby Cosmo www.youtube.com

"My mom, I would say, was slightly thrown by it and didn't quite understand it," Jost said. "I don't know if she thought it was kind of like a hippie thing."

Even though the couple made the name official on the birth certificate, his mother wouldn't let the issue go.

"She would call us after three or four days," he explained. "And she'd be like, 'And now, is it final? Like, did you submit the birth certificate?' And we're like, 'Oh, yeah, we did that at the hospital.'"

Then she started suggesting names that sounded like Cosmo, but were a few letters off.

"She was like 'OK, interesting. Because I was reading that there's also a name Cosimo with an 'I,' so that could also be an option. Maybe Cosimo, that's his real name, but then you can call him still Cosmo,'" Jost said as his mother.

He recalled: "Then she goes, 'There's a patron saint called Cosmos, so that's another option.' We don't need more worse variants on Cosmo. But thanks, Mom."

Jost's mother's process of dealing with her grandchild's name followed the five stages of acceptance: denial, anger, depression, bargaining, and acceptance.

It appears as though she finally came to accept the baby's name when her neighbors on Staten Island told her that it's a common name amongst Italian-Americans.

"Eventually, she started meeting various members of the Italian community who have a lot of Cosmo relatives," Jost said. "And so then she would call, and she would say, 'I met someone — they said their uncle's name is Cosmo. So it is OK.'"



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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Is today going to be a bones day or a no-bones day?

Each year on Groundhog Day, Punxsutawney Phil—aka the world's most famous groundhog—peeks his head out and determines whether winter will last another six weeks or not based on whether he sees his shadow. There's a whole ceremony for the event and everything. (Ah, the hilariously bizarre things we people do for fun.)

Phil now has competition in the adorable animal prediction world, only instead of a groundhog, we've got Noodle the ground-dog.

Noodle is a 13-year-old pug who really, really loves the ground. So much so that on some days, he simply refuses to get up off it, which has turned him into a viral daily prediction sensation.

On his TikTok channel, Noodle's owner shares the senior puggo's decision about what kind of day it's going to be based on whether he "has bones" that day or not. If Noodle gets propped up and decides to stay standing on his own four feet, it's a "bones day." If he gets picked up and immediately flumps back down onto the ground, it's a "no-bones day."

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