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Parents react to video of Britney Spears 'yelling' at her kids and it's a great teaching moment

Can we just admit that parenting is hard for everyone?

Parents react to video of Britney Spears 'yelling' at her kids and it's a great teaching moment

Parents respond to video of Britney Spears.

Parenting is hard for just about everyone. You're completely responsible for a small human that doesn't come with an instruction manual, and it's a case of trying to do the best you can with what you've got. Some people seem to think that celebrities should be infallible, so when Kevin Federline shared a video of Britney Spears being stern with her children there was always going to be negative feedback. But surprisingly, the video has, in fact, stirred up more support for the star and her parenting methods.


If you've been on the internet for any amount of time you know that parent shaming is something that comes in like a tidal wave on an unsuspecting parent just sharing their truth. It seems especially vicious towards moms, so much so that the phrase mom-shaming was coined some time ago. Mom-shaming is the act of judging and attacking mothers for their personal parenting choices. But lately there's been some push back on the normalization of mom-shaming that has been a part of internet culture since mom groups were formed. Parents are daring to show their messy houses and parenting failures on their way to getting things right for their children.

Tweet reply defending Spears by The Black Daria

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Federline's reasons for posting the videos of Spears disciplining her children is unclear. Perhaps it was to embarrass her or show her as an unfit parent. But parents across the internet were having none of it. Sure there were a few here and there that criticized, but most comments were supportive of the pop star. Parents are owning that this parenting gig is hard and capturing a few minutes of out-of-context video doesn't show the whole story and they said just that.

One Twitter user, Ask Aubry, posted the "damaging" video of Spears and said, "Wait, Britney Spears giving her kids clear boundaries, expectations and wanting them to know her worth & value like millions of other parents have in a highly out-of-context and edited video, is Kevin Federline's 'gotcha' moment?" She wasn't alone in her musing. The Twitter users' comments were filled with parents agreeing with the sentiment.

Another person with the user name Arcane Saint commented, "I see not one thing wrong with this interaction. I am so upset & heartbroken for Britney 💔💔💔." Under TMZ's Twitter feed for the same video, the support was still overwhelmingly evident with many users echoing the same sentiment, that they saw nothing wrong in the video.

Tweets defending Spears by Laura and Hailstate.

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It seems the only parent being questioned in the comments is Federline, which may not have been what he was hoping for when he shared these private videos. It appears Spears has plenty of supporters who didn't take kindly to Federline's attempt to shame her.

There seems to be a noticeable shift from mom-shaming to mom-supporting on social media, and that can only be a good thing. Parenting is hard enough on its own and co-parenting with someone outside of your home can add an additional layer of hard, especially when things are less-than amicable.

After winning the fight to end her conservatorship in 2021, Spears is under even more scrutiny than the average celebrity. Seeing parents come to the defense of Spears as a fellow parent is heartwarming. Maybe the unintended result of all this could be the two of them working toward a more healthy co-parenting relationship, preferably outside of the public eye.

Kevin Federline Posts Videos of Britney Spears Arguing with Sons



Kevin Federline has had enough of Britney Spears' public attacks on their two sons, Sean and Jayden, and now he wants to show the world just how contentious he says Britney's relationship has been with the boys for years.

@racheleehiggins/TikTok

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