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As the cost of college skyrockets, one school has a radical new plan: a free education.

It's about time we stop saddling students with massive debt, and instead focus on providing affordable education.

Over the past decade, the cost of college has boomed.

At private, four-year colleges, the cost of tuition and fees has risen by nearly 25%. And at public, four-year schools, tuition and fees have risen by more than 40%.

As a result, the amount of debt carried by the average student has risen. Total outstanding student loans now tops $1.2 trillion.

(Yes, trillion — with a "t.")



In a major contrast to how things are handled in the U.S., Germany announced all public universities will be tuition-free.

This is huge. And hey, it almost makes me want to pack up, start brushing up on German, and emigrate.


But did you know some schools offer a way to do this in the U.S.? And without a scholarship.

At Yale and Harvard, students who come from families making less than $65,000 per year can attend school tuition-free.

At Princeton, the school waives tuition for students coming from families with yearly incomes less than $120,000.

Stanford recently made news by expanding its program, waiving tuition fees for students from families making less than $125,000.

In addition, students from families making less than $65,000 per year will receive free room and board.

This comes as the cost of attending the highly touted California university creeps past $60,000 per year.

It's great news for students who otherwise wouldn't be able to afford Stanford. But the school's admissions criteria is extremely selective (accepting around just 5% of applicants).

The school is only able to offer such deep discounts because:

  1. The more financially well-off students' fees help offset the cost of those in need.
  2. And the school's $21 billion endowment fund (compared to the average private-college endowment of around just $26 million).

But what about the rest of us who can't (or don't want to) attend Stanford? What can we do?

Well, at the moment, there are a few ideas being tossed around.

In January, President Obama proposed that all Americans be allowed to attend two years of community college at no cost.

Unfortunately, it doesn't look like this is likely to get the approval in Congress needed to become a reality.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren proposed a bill that would have allowed students to refinance their loans at then-current interest rates.

Again, unfortunately, the bill never came up for a vote in the Senate.

More than ever, programs like Stanford's are needed — but for all students.

No matter how financially well-off or challenged people might be, if they want to attend college, they should be able to without having to worry about carrying around a massive debt for the rest of their lives.

Learn more about Stanford's new tuition program in the video below:

via FIRST

FIRST students learn real-world career skills through robotics competitions.

True

In today’s rapidly changing world, most parents are concerned about what the future looks like for their children. Whether concerning technology, culture, or values, young people today are expected to navigate—and attempt to thrive in—a society that’s far more complicated than that of their parents. It’s one of the reasons why parents are keen to involve their kids in activities that will help them become more resilient, well-rounded and better prepared for life when they enter adulthood.

One such activity is FIRST®, a volunteer-based global robotics community that helps young people discover a passion for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) through exciting, multifaceted challenges. FIRST helps kids ages 4 to 18 to build confidence, resilience, cooperation and empathy as they compete and collaborate with one another.

You may have seen the transformative power of FIRST programs featured in the new 2022 Disney+ documentary “More Than Robots.”

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via Pexels

Three people engaged in conversation at a party.

There are some people who live under the illusion that everything they say is deeply interesting and have no problem wasting your time by rambling on and on without a sign of stopping. They’re the relative, neighbor or co-worker who can’t take a hint that the conversation is over.

Of all these people, the co-worker who can’t stop talking may be the most challenging because you see them every day in a professional setting that requires politeness.

There are many reasons that some people talk excessively. Therapist F. Diane Barth writes in Psychology Today that some people talk excessively because they don’t have the ability to process complex auditory signals, so they ramble on without recognizing the subtle cues others are sending.

It may also be a case of someone who thinks they’re the most interesting person in the conversation.

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Joy

Save dogs & farm animals all before your morning cup of coffee

A quality coffee roaster that makes a difference

Tackling anything before you finish your first cup of joe seems like a tall order, but with Hugo Coffee Roasters you can turn your morning ritual into an act of kindness. This female-founded, fair trade organic coffee roaster partners with different organizations to help save the lives of rescue dogs and farm animals. Here's how they do it:

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One of these things is not like the other.

Sometimes, life can unexpectedly snatch you away from safety and thrust you into imminent danger. Other times, life can just as quickly turn a dire circumstance into a heartwarming miracle.

Such was the case for a baby hawk who went from being dinner to being adopted by a family of bald eagles near the city of Nanaimo in British Columbia, Canada. The amazing moment was captured by a 24-hour livestream webcam run by GROWLS, a nonprofit organization that helps rescue and rehabilitate injured wildlife.

The video shows the seemingly doomed baby hawk being tossed into an eaglet’s nest. Pam McCartney, a GROWLS volunteer who had been watching the livestream at the time, braced herself.

"Usually when I watch, like, David Attenborough and his shows, I can close my eyes or fast forward or whatever, but this was live at the time, and I was just like, oh, my gosh, oh, my gosh," she told CBC.

Much to her surprise, nature seemed to have something else in mind.

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