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An actress was told to bring an 'easy access skirt' to a casting call. Well, dang.

It's not just an "easy access skirt." Just take a look at some of the roles that actresses see on casting calls everyday.

These are all REAL role descriptions. REALLY.

The role that could be filled by a cardboard cutout:

"Seeking Beautiful Girl (Non-Speaking)"


The role that seems more suitable for a coat hanger ... or two:

"Seeking Bikini Babe to stand with another Bikini Babe."

The role that could be played by literally any woman. Seriously, what does this even mean?

"Seeking Girlfriends of male principals."

What specific acting skills does it take to play a girlfriend of a male principal? How is that different from playing a girlfriend of a female principal or just playing a woman who happens to have a boyfriend or a woman in general?

The role that doesn't get that being female, real, and butchy are not mutually exclusive personality traits:

"Seeking Female. Real. Honest. But not too butchy."

So are the casting folks here saying that it's OK to be a real, honest woman as long as you're not masculine? Or are they saying that they don't want lesbians to apply? Either way, that feels offensive, and I'm confused.

The role that combines too many offensive things to count:

"Seeking Drunken Girl 'Slapper' at a party. Actress must have 'easy access skirt' in which to be 'taken from behind.' Consent to have fake vomit thrown on her."

Just FYI, I counted, and there are at least seven majorly offensive things here: 1. This is a casting for a regular feature film, not a porn. 2. This is not even a fleshed-out character. They would have no name and be sexually assaulted as a background prop. 3. While I totally get the need for background characters — not everyone gets a speaking role — this wouldn't be so upsetting if it wasn't one of the only casting options available for women. 4. "Easy access skirt." 5. "Taken from behind." 6. "Fake vomit." 7. "Thrown on her."

Really, Hollywood?

Now, ladies, tell us how you really feel.

And they're not done. These talented women have plenty more to say. Check out more of their thoughts in the video below:

For more videos on this subject, check out this powerful video — featuring interviews with the amazing cast of the web series "Misspelled," talking about their experience as actors of color at casting calls, first published Sept. 10, 2014.

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