Alanis Morissette updated ‘Ironic’ for today’s problems and it’s hilarious.

Alanis Morissette’s 1995 song “Ironic” was a massive hit, making the top five in Australia, Canada, the U.S., and Norway. It would go on to be nominated for two Grammys and its video featuring Morissette singing in a large automobile would be nominated for six MTV video music awards.

But the song has drawn more than a few raised eyebrows from pedants across the English-speaking world for being about coincidences, not irony. But who cares? It’s still a good song.

20 years later, Morissette updated her song with the help of “The Late Late Show” host James Corden to reflect modern problems, including Facebook, vaping, Netflix, and Southwest flights.


She even made fun of her original song singing, “It’s singing ‘Ironic,’ but there are no ironies / And who would’ve thought it figures?”

An old friend sends you a Facebook request

You only find out they’re racist after you accept

There’s free office cake on the first day of your diet

It’s like they announce a new iPhone the day after you buy it

And isn’t it ironic, don’t you think?

It’s like swiping left on your future soulmate

It’s a Snapchat that you wish you had saved

It’s a funny tweet that nobody faves

And who would’ve thought it figures

It’s a traffic jam when you try to use Waze

A no-smoking sign when you brought your vape

It’s 10,000 male late-night hosts when all you want is just one woman, seriously!

It’s singing the duet of your dreams, and then Alanis Morissette shouting at you

And isn’t it ironic, don’t you think?

A little too ironic, and yeah I really do think

It’s like you’re first class on a Southwest plane

Then you realize that every seat is the same

It’s like Amazon but your package never came

And who would’ve thought it figures

It’s like Netflix but you own DVDs

It’s a free ride but your Uber’s down the street

It’s singing “Ironic,” but there are no ironies

And who would’ve thought it figures

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.