+

Alanis Morissette’s 1995 song “Ironic” was a massive hit, making the top five in Australia, Canada, the U.S., and Norway. It would go on to be nominated for two Grammys and its video featuring Morissette singing in a large automobile would be nominated for six MTV video music awards.

But the song has drawn more than a few raised eyebrows from pedants across the English-speaking world for being about coincidences, not irony. But who cares? It’s still a good song.

20 years later, Morissette updated her song with the help of “The Late Late Show” host James Corden to reflect modern problems, including Facebook, vaping, Netflix, and Southwest flights.


She even made fun of her original song singing, “It’s singing ‘Ironic,’ but there are no ironies / And who would’ve thought it figures?”

An old friend sends you a Facebook request

You only find out they’re racist after you accept

There’s free office cake on the first day of your diet

It’s like they announce a new iPhone the day after you buy it

And isn’t it ironic, don’t you think?

It’s like swiping left on your future soulmate

It’s a Snapchat that you wish you had saved

It’s a funny tweet that nobody faves

And who would’ve thought it figures

It’s a traffic jam when you try to use Waze

A no-smoking sign when you brought your vape

It’s 10,000 male late-night hosts when all you want is just one woman, seriously!

It’s singing the duet of your dreams, and then Alanis Morissette shouting at you

And isn’t it ironic, don’t you think?

A little too ironic, and yeah I really do think

It’s like you’re first class on a Southwest plane

Then you realize that every seat is the same

It’s like Amazon but your package never came

And who would’ve thought it figures

It’s like Netflix but you own DVDs

It’s a free ride but your Uber’s down the street

It’s singing “Ironic,” but there are no ironies

And who would’ve thought it figures

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


Keep ReadingShow less
Identity

Sacheen Littlefeather, who famously appeared in Marlon Brando's place at Oscars, has passed away

'It feels like the sacred circle is completing itself before I go in this life.'

Native American activist Sacheen Littlefeather.

A little more than two weeks after receiving a formal apology from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for the abuse she suffered at the 1973 Academy Awards, Native American rights activist Sacheen Littlefeather has died at age 75.

Littlefeather is a Native American civil rights activist born to an Apache and Yaqui father and a European American mother. Littlefeather made history at the 1973 Academy Awards by forcing Hollywood and America to confront its mistreatment of Native Americans by rejecting Brando's award on his behalf.

Dressed in traditional clothing, she explained that Brando "very regretfully cannot accept this generous award, the reasons for this being … the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry and on television in movie reruns, and also with recent happenings at Wounded Knee."

Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 08.05.21


Six years ago, a high school student named Christopher Justice eloquently explained the multiple problems with flying the Confederate flag. A video clip of Justice's truth bomb has made the viral rounds a few times since then, and here it is once again getting the attention it deserves.

Justice doesn't just explain why the flag is seen as a symbol of racism. He also explains the history of when the flag originated and why flying a Confederate flag makes no sense for people who claim to be loyal Americans.

But that clip, as great as it is, is a small part of the whole story. Knowing how the discussion came about and seeing the full debate in context is even more impressive.

Keep ReadingShow less