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A straightforward solution to men saying gross things to women on the street

Artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh went to Mexico City and listened. She made posters of what she heard.

A straightforward solution to men saying gross things to women on the street

Artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh has a street art project that empowers women who are violated on the street to stand up and speak out. How does she do that?


She goes to cities with nothing but an open heart, ears to listen, and the supplies to make some art.

She listens to the comments women receive on the street. This time in Mexico City.

Seriously though ... what is wrong with people?

OK, yoga breathing, yoga breathing...

Tatyana Fazlalizadeh! Come save the day please.

OK, phew. Next, Tatyana illustrates the stories AND the badass faces of women that she meets ...

... and she makes posters.


Posters of what these women WOULD want to say to their harassers.

"Yo merezco ser respetada."

"I deserve to be respected."

And she puts them up on the very streets where these women were harassed.

"Basta de sus miradas subvercivas, cobardes, de tu violencia machista."

"Stop the domineering, cowardly staring of your chauvinist violence."

"Si una mujer no te pide o no te pregunta, no tienes ni derecho a decirle nada ni a tocarla."

"If a woman doesn't request or ask you to, you don't have the right to say anything or touch her."

"No quiero tus palabras. No te quiero cerca de mi."

"I don't want your words. I don't want you near me."

"Detenente de violarnos. Deja de matarnos."

"Stop raping us. Stop killing us."

"No lo hago por ti, lo hago por mi. Si me visto asi es por que a mi me gusta."

"I'm not doing it for you, I'm doing it for me. If I dress like this, it's because I like it."

BOOM.

What a powerful way to make important voices be heard.

For more out-there voices, follow Fusion on Facebook.

via Texas State Senate and The ACLU

There has been a tidal wave of anti-trans legislation proposed over the past few months in the U.S. At least 17 states are now considering restricting anyone under the age of 18 from transition-related care.

Texas is currently debating two anti-trans bills. Once would criminalize parents for allowing their children to receive gender-affirming treatments. Another would criminalize healthcare professionals who administer them.

For a state that prides itself on promoting personal freedom, these bills go out of their way to punish medical professionals and parents for making deeply personal choices. Shouldn't doctors and parents have the right to make medical decisions for children without the state's involvement?

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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