Heroes

A Smartypants Scientist Makes An Easy Analogy About Our Planet, And Now I'm Scared

A good analogy can go a long way. What's great about this clip is that it starts out all cheery and hypothetical. Then here comes the punch line and BAM you're sort of kind of terrified. I know I am.

We've got your attention, so let's note that population growth hasn't been perfectly exponential everywhere on the planet. But growth has without a doubt been explosive, and that means our planet is at risk. We have to do something about this.

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Right now, we are in a critical moment where more Americans are engaging with the topic of race than ever before.

There is so much work to be done, but people who aren't accustomed to thinking this much about race are struggling to condition themselves. Factor in a global pandemic, economic insecurity, and the stressors of working and schooling from home, and allies are at an increasingly high risk of burnout.

Marginalized and oppressed people need allies to learn to pace themselves. But how?

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Researchers at the University of Houston have developed a filtration system that can instantly neutralize and kill 99.8% of the coronavirus after a single pass through.

"It's basically a high-performance COVID-19 killer," Dr. Garrett Peel of Medistar, who helped craft the design, said according to Fox News.

The filter looks to be an important tool in fighting a virus that can remain in the air for hours and, in turn, spread more readily than viruses like the common flu. Harvard Health says that aerosolized coronavirus can remain in the air for up to three hours.

People who are asymptomatic can easily spread it to multiple people when they talk, breathe, cough, or sneeze.

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Photo by Li-An Lim on Unsplash
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Since COVID-19 was identified in December 2019, it has spread around the world, wreaking havoc on our daily lives.

As of July 6, 2020, there have been over 11.5 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported across 216 countries and territories.

Over 500,000 people have died.

Cities and countries instituted strict lockdowns or issued shelter-in-place orders, but as we retreated indoors to flatten the curve, economies ground to a halt. Millions of people have lost their jobs. Hospital ICUs hit capacity. Inequality has been made painfully obvious as the most marginalized communities are forced to bear the worst impacts. Never before has it been more clear just how interconnected our health and the health of the planet truly is.

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The Veterinary Care Group's Westbury location in Long Island had their first case of the coronavirus a week after two New York house cats had tested positive for Covid-19 on April 22 — the first pets in the U.S. to have the virus.

It was a fearful day, as one of the workers at the veterinary hospital tested positive— although it wasn't from caring for an infected animal. "It's not confirmed that dogs or cats can spread the virus to humans. There's no evidence of that," says Medical Director Mario Costa of the Oyster Bay and Westbury locations.


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