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A Little Girl Writes A Letter To DC Comics They Should Keep On Every Wall

I wrote a letter like this to Nintendo when I was 11 years old. It's a shame so little has changed.

A Little Girl Writes A Letter To DC Comics They Should Keep On Every Wall

Dear DC comics,

My name is Rowan and I am 11 years old. I love superheroes and have been reading comics and watching superhero cartoons and movies since I was very young. I'm a girl, and I'm upset because there aren't very many girl superheroes or movies and comics from DC.

For my birthday, I got some of your Justice League Chibis™. I noticed in the little pamphlet that there are only 2 girl Chibis, and 10 boys. Also, the background for the girl figures was all pink and purple.

I remember watching Justice League cartoons when I was really young with my dad. There are Superman and Batman movies, but not a Wonder Woman one. You have a Flash TV show, but not a Wonder Woman one. Marvel Comics made a movie about a talking tree and raccoon awesome, but you haven't made a movie with Wonder Woman.

I would really like a Hawgirl (sic) or Catwoman or the girls of the Young Justice TV show action figures please. I love your comics, but I would love them a whole lot more if there were more girls.

I asked a lot of the people I know whether they watched movies or read books or comics where girls were the main characters, they all said yes.

Please do something about this. Girls read comics too and they care.

Sincerely, Rowan.













DC Comics responded via Twitter:



But fans know that a couple tweets does not equal action.


Even though there have been female fans as long as there have been comic books, the industry itself is overwhelmingly male. The excuse that comic book fans are all guys anyway was never really true, and now that the characters are gaining mainstream attention via television and movie franchises, the industry can't keep ignoring fans who aren't male.


The industry needs to change the way it staffs these projects.



It all starts with the people who make the product. It's not reasonable to expect all-male teams to effectively write or draw female characters. It's not reasonable to expect all-male teams to create products and marketing campaigns that appeal to other genders without painting them into a dainty, pink-and-purple corner. Those genders have to be in the room.

It needs to change the way it presents them.



Female fans have been complaining more and more loudly about the sexy-for-the-sake-of-sexy treatment of female characters. It's really obvious that superheroines and supervillainesses are portrayed as eye candy in a way that male characters aren't. It's not good for children of any gender to see women portrayed primarily as sexpots.

It needs to highlight female characters the same way it highlights male characters.



Time and time again, studios are gambling on investing in female characters and finding those bets pay off big with fans of all genders. But we need to get to the point where investing in female characters is not considered a "bet" and instead a normal part of doing business.

But the changes are coming slowly and fans are loving it.






If you agree that powerful female superheroes are good for ALL kids, tell everyone by sharing this.

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