Woman miraculously finds a dog lost three years ago after spotting it on a beer can
via Kim Kuizon / Twitter

Three years ago, Monica Mathis's dog Hazel, a terrier mix, disappeared from her front yard. "She was on a leash outside and I went to get her and she was gone from our yard," Mathis told ABC News.

After an intense search for the dog that came up empty, Monica thought she was gone forever. At the time, Mathis lived in Iowa and later moved to Minnesota for a job.

Three years later, in January of this year, Motorworks Brewing company of Bradenton, Florida, launched a promotional campaign where it featured photos of dogs from a local shelter on cans of beer.


The promotion was to notify the public of the missing dogs while raising money for shelters.

Mathis saw photos of the beer cans on social media and one of the dogs bore an uncanny resemblance to her long lost Hazel. "'Oh my gosh that looks like my dog, I think that's my dog,'" Mathis told KSTP. "I have no idea how she got to Florida."

She reached out to Manatee County Animal Shelter who asked for proof that Hazel was hers."I sent everything I could find -- all the pictures so I could stop an adoption process from happening because I could've lost her again," Mathis said.

via ABC Action News / Twitter

Hans Wohlgefahrt of Manatee County Animal Services compared the veterinarian records and photos Mathis sent and saw it was a match.

"This dog was such an important part of her family that she had everything to prove she was her owner," Wohlgefahrt said.

After looking at the evidence, the shelter agreed that a miracle had happened — Hazel would be reunited with Mathis. "I was amazed, I was crying. An emotional wreck," Mathis said.

Not only will the two be reunited from across the country, the the nonprofit Friends of Manatee County Animal Services has agreed to cover the costs of transporting Hazel to Minnesota.

"I feel blessed that my baby's going to get to come home and I get her back, Mathis said according to CNN.

The story of Monica and Hazel comes with a lesson: make sure you keep your microchip information current. Animal services couldn't connect the dog and owner because the contact information on Hazel's chip was out of date.

"There was really no way we could trace her back to that particular owner," Wohlgefahrt said. "It's a great reminder to people when they do these things to go into their profile and make sure all their contact information is up to date."

"Keep track of exactly what company you use, make sure your stuff gets updated, especially if your pet goes missing and don't ever give up," Mathis said according to The New York Post.

Motherhood is a journey unlike any other, and one that is nearly impossible to prepare for. No matter how many parenting books you read, how many people you talk to, how many articles you peruse before having kids, your children will emerge as completely unique creatures who impact your world in ways you could never have anticipated.

Those of us who have been parenting for a while have some wisdom to share from experience. Not that older moms know everything, of course, but hindsight can offer some perspective that's hard to find when you're in the thick of early motherhood.

Upworthy asked our readers who are moms what they wish they could tell their younger selves about motherhood, and the responses were both honest and wholesome. Here's what they said:

Lighten up. Don't sweat the small stuff.

One of the most common responses was to stop worrying about the little things so much, try to be present with your kids, and enjoy the time you have with them:

"Relax and enjoy them. If your house is a mess, so be it. Stay in the moment as they are temporary..more so than you think, sometimes. We lost our beautiful boy to cancer 15+yrs ago. I loved him more than life itself..💔 "- Janet

"Don't worry about the dishes, laundry and other chores. Read the kids another book. Go outside and make a mud pie. Throw the baseball around a little longer. Color another picture. Take more pictures and make sure you are in the pictures too! My babies are 19 and 17 and I would give anything to relive an ordinary Saturday from 15 years ago." - Emma H.

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Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
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The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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