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A cop asks if she has a weapon. He doesn't like her quick response.

In just under four minutes, two women expose some hardcore reasons why lots of kids just don't like school.

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The Atlantic Philanthropies

For these women, a few reasons come to mind...

If you missed it, here's why Denice Frohman, Dominique Christina, and lots of other folks might not like school.


The experience they lay out in this spoken-word performance begins with a police officer greeting them at the entrance of their high school, a common security measure in the wake of campus violence that often makes students feel like they're entering a war zone. But unfortunately, that's not where it ends.

As described in the poem, a typical day starts off like this:

A police officer greets them at the front of their high school.

He's got a gun perched on each hip.

He asks them if they have any weapons.

Their response?

Being treated like a criminal wasn't the worst part about their high-school experience though.

What really stings is sitting in a classroom and feeling like you don't exist.

When kids are taught that only one group of people is responsible for the history of a vast, diverse nation, they feel left out … unmotivated ... unimportant … all of the hurt feelings.

"The first time I read a book by a Latina author, I was in college. The wind in my chest stood up. It had been 18 long years of textbooks filled with everything but me. For the first time, my body knew a world that could hold it. The quickest way to silence a mouth is to treat it as if none had come before." — Denice Frohman

The tendency for history classes to breeze over the contributions of women, people of color, and LGBT folks is not necessarily the fault of teachers. They're often only passing along what they know. But we've got to do better.

In addition to treating kids as students — not criminals — overall curriculum needs a makeover.

Here's a few resources that focus on telling our diverse history. They include cool lesson plans for teachers.

Zinn Education Project

Rethinking Schools

GLSEN

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A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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People have clearly missed their free treats.

The COVID-19 pandemic had us waving a sad farewell to many of life’s modern conveniences. And where it certainly hasn’t been the worst loss, not having free samples at grocery stores has undoubtedly been a buzzkill. Sure, one can shop around without the enticing scent of hot, fresh artisan pizza cut into tiny slices or testing out the latest fancy ice cream … but is it as joyful? Not so much.

Trader Joe’s, famous for its prepandemic sampling stations, has recently brought the tradition back to life, and customers are practically dancing through the aisles.


On the big comeback weekend, people flocked to social media to share images and videos of their free treats, including festive Halloween cookies (because who doesn’t love TJ’s holiday themed items?) along with hopeful messages for the future.
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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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