6 items America should have on its holiday wish list to prepare for President Trump.

In too many ways, 2016 has been a rough one for America.

Way too many of our favorite celebrities died. We suffered a great deal of loss at the hands of Mother Nature. And now, this — we're capping off 12 tumultuous months with the end to maybe the most divisive, mind-boggling election in U.S. history, and many people have been left anxious about the prospects of President Donald Trump.

As we move into the holiday season, thinking about giving back and being thankful, there are a few things America desperately needs now as we all prepare to move into 2017.


Here are six gifts you can give America this holiday season:

1. The gift of more digital and print newspaper subscriptions to keep Washington (and Trump) honest and citizens informed.

Photo by Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images.

Votes aside, no election is influenced by just one factor. But this election in particular felt the brunt of fake and misleading news on social media and cable news coverage that focused more on style than on substance.

Newspapers, on the other hand, provided some incredibly thoughtful and important reporting on the election and the state of our country — from Trump's questionable history paying federal taxes to Hillary Clinton's complex time as secretary of state. The more newspaper subscriptions we have at our fingertips, the better. Give the gift of a newspaper subscription (or share your subscription with a friend), and the entire country becomes a better informed place to be.

2. Give the gift of an LGBTQ community that understands they are all of value, no matter who they love or how they identify.

Last week, as it became clearer Trump will be our next president, calls to suicide prevention hotlines for the LGBTQ community spiked. Tragically, it's not all that surprising — Trump and vice president-elect Mike Pence are peddling possibly the most anti-LGBTQ platform in party history.

Photo courtesy of Trans Lifeline, used with permission.

Proceeds for the shirt above by Trans Lifeline go to enabling the nonprofit to help more people in times of crisis. Their services will be critical throughout the next four years.

We can also support groups like The Trevor Project and the Human Rights Campaign to make sure the voices of our LGBTQ friends and family are elevated and prioritized, even if a Trump White House likely won't be listening.

3. The gift of making immigrants feel right at home in their new country.

Building a wall became a cornerstone in Trump's campaign. Our president-elect has threatened to deport millions of people and has demonized millions more. Many immigrant children and families are understandably afraid, left feeling as though their country doesn't want them here.

But organizations like Soccer Without Borders want every kid to succeed in America.

The U.S. branch of the nonprofit — based in Oakland, California — uses soccer as a catalyst to unite kids from various backgrounds and different countries through sport. The group provides educational support, creates community service opportunities, and has a great track record at helping empower kids toward academic success.

We can also support groups like E4FC, which connect young undocumented immigrants to the legal and academic resources they need to achieve their goals, and Voto Latino, which empowers Latinos to become agents of change in their communities.

4. Give the gift of a green Earth that will stay habitable for centuries to come.

Soon, we'll have a president who's called global warming a hoax invented by the Chinese. That should be terrifying to anyone who wants their grandkids to live on a beautiful planet.

Ryan Reynolds, American Forests ambassador, plants the group's 50 millionth tree in 2015 in California. Photo by Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Eddie Bauer.

Let's not beat around the bush — we need to do a lot to combat climate change, and we need to do a lot now. We can pressure our legislators to support clean energy, do our own part to live an eco-friendly life, and — maybe the easiest one — plant more trees.

Through conservation nonprofit American Forests, we can gift new trees to plant on behalf of others, and help offset our collective carbon footprint. Each tree costs just $1 to be planted, so you can see how a $25 or $50 gift can certainly grow into a huge impact.

5. The gift of security for every person seeking to access their right to an abortion.

Trump — who once suggested women should be "punished" for having an abortion — has vowed to appoint Supreme Court justices who would flip Roe v. Wade, the landmark case that confirmed a person's right to choose. This means well-funded and accessible clinics are more important now than ever before.

By supporting organizations like Planned Parenthood, its advocacy wing, PPact, and local chapters in your area, we can avoid going backward.

Photo courtesy of the Clinic Vest Project, used with permission.

The Clinic Vest Project is one group helping clinics like Planned Parenthood do their work by providing vests, like the one seen above, to the friendly human shields that escort women from their cars to the facility entrance, oftentimes through aggressive protesters. That walk can be a painful and intimidating experience for someone who might already be in a vulnerable state, so these helpful, supportive people — wearing colorful vests to show they're an ally — are crucial.

6. The gift of more diverse children's media — because representation matters, now more than ever.

Kids are feeling anxious and uncertain on the heels of the election — especially children from groups that have been mocked or criticized during the campaign, like immigrants, Muslims, people with disabilities, and LGBTQ people. It's important we reassure them that, yes, they are loved and that we're a society that values diversity and inclusion.

Children's books that make this point clear — like "Promised Land," which follows the interracial love story of Prince Leo and his farm boy crush, Jack — should be in playrooms and classrooms across the country.

Photo courtesy of "Promised Land," used with permission.

Fortunately, more and more children's books reflect the diverse world we live in, and many other titles are exemplifying why it matters our kids see themselves in the pages between their fingertips.

Diverse kids' media shouldn't be confined to books, though — film, toys, and TV series are just as crucial. Shows like Nickelodeon's "The Loud House" and coloring books like "Dream Big! More than a Princess" can be awesome tools that encourage our children to be confident in who they are and understand that they matter.

America has always been the sum its parts. The combined contributions of those of us who live here are what makes it great. Let that inspire you to kick off 2017 with a clear head, a big heart, and a determined spirit.

No one's disputing that this year has been a rocky one in more ways than we'd care to admit. But we made it.

If you're on edge about what 2017 will mean for you and your loved ones under our new president, don't feel helpless — fight to make sure America stays true to all the values that make us the great country that we are.

Courtesy of FIELDTRIP
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The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected diverse communities due largely in part to social factors such as inadequate access to housing, income, dietary options, education and employment — all of which have been shown to affect people's physical health.

Recognizing that inequity, Harlem-based chef JJ Johnson sought out to help his community maximize its health during the pandemic — one grain at a time.

Johnson manages FIELDTRIP, a health-focused restaurant that strives to bring people together through the celebration of rice, a grain found in cuisines of countless cultures.

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Lack of education and access to those healthy food options is a primary driver of why 31% of adults in Harlem are struggling with obesity — the highest rate of any neighborhood in New York City and 7% higher than the average adult obesity rate across the five boroughs.

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Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
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Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

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