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How young Republicans and Democrats are coming together to help Louisiana flood victims.

'After all, Southern hospitality knows no political affiliation.'

How young Republicans and Democrats are coming together to help Louisiana flood victims.

Between the presidential election and a recent streak of natural disasters, both political and environmental climates have been rather nasty so far in 2016.

It's almost as though the environment has been responding to all the political dissonance, from relentless raging fires in California to historic flooding in West Virginia, Maryland, and now southern Louisiana.

Leslie Andermann Gallagher surveys the flood damage to her home. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.


Louisianans are not recovering alone, though — they have help, thanks to a rather unlikely bipartisan effort.

The Texas Young Republicans and Young Democrats have set differing political views aside to unite and help their neighboring state of Louisiana.‌‌

The plan is a simple: they've set up an Amazon wish list for those displaced by the flooding. Anyone wanting to help can choose items from the list and send them to this address at checkout:

Scott’s Drum Center, C/O Flood Relief 4956 Johnston St, Lafayette, LA 70503.

Once the Louisiana teams on the ground receive the supplies, they distribute them to the families in need.

The Arkansas Young Republicans started the effort. When the Texas Young Republicans decided to lend a hand, the Texas Young Democrats reached out to president of the TYRs, John Baucum, to see if they could be of service.

‌Photo by Brian Smialowski/Getty Images.‌

According to TYD Communications Director Chelsea Roe, both groups have been working together in perfect bipartisan harmony since day one of the collaboration.

Roe believes being a younger generation is one reason why their cooperative efforts are working so well.

"We understand that a diversification of ideas is what makes us better as a human race," she said over email. "At the end of it all, that's what we have in common — we want to leave this world we live in a better place than it was when we came into it."

‌Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images. ‌

Baucum expressed similar sentiments to the Dallas Morning News: "At the end of the day, we all live and work together."

Our country might be divided when it comes to political beliefs, but in the face of a crisis, it's wonderful to see people putting those differences aside for the greater good.

Photo courtesy of Capital One
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Growing up in Virginia, Dominique Meeks Gombe idolized her family physician — a young Black woman who inspired Meeks Gombe to pursue her passion for chemistry.

While Meeks Gombe began her career working in an environmental chemistry lab, after observing multiple inefficient processes in and around the lab, she took the initiative to teach herself to code in order to automate and streamline those issues.

That sparked her love for coding and imminent career shift. Now a software engineer at Capital One, Meeks Gombe wants to be a similar role model to her childhood mentor and encourage girls to pursue any career they desire.

"I'm so passionate about technology because that's where the world is going," Meeks Gombe said. "All of today's problems will be solved using technology. So it's very important for me, as a Black woman, to be at the proverbial table with my unique perspective."

Since 2019, she and her fellow Capital One associates have partnered with the Capital One Coders program and Girls For A Change to teach coding fundamentals to middle school girls.

The nonprofit's mission is aimed at empowering Black girls in Central Virginia. The organization focuses on designing, leading, funding and implementing social change projects that tackle issues girls face in their own neighborhoods.

Girls For a Change is one of many local nonprofits that receive support from the Capital One Impact Initiative, which strives to close gaps in equity while helping people gain better access to economic and social opportunities. The initial $200 million, five-year national commitment aims to support growth in underserved communities as well as advance socioeconomic mobility.

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This article originally appeared on 06.16.15


A lot of parents are tired of being told how technology is screwing up their kids.

Moms and dads of the digital age are well aware of the growing competition for their children's attention, and they're bombarded at each turn of the page or click of the mouse with both cutting-edge ideas and newfound worries for raising great kids.

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