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How young Republicans and Democrats are coming together to help Louisiana flood victims.

'After all, Southern hospitality knows no political affiliation.'

Between the presidential election and a recent streak of natural disasters, both political and environmental climates have been rather nasty so far in 2016.

It's almost as though the environment has been responding to all the political dissonance, from relentless raging fires in California to historic flooding in West Virginia, Maryland, and now southern Louisiana.

Leslie Andermann Gallagher surveys the flood damage to her home. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.


Louisianans are not recovering alone, though — they have help, thanks to a rather unlikely bipartisan effort.

The Texas Young Republicans and Young Democrats have set differing political views aside to unite and help their neighboring state of Louisiana.‌‌

The plan is a simple: they've set up an Amazon wish list for those displaced by the flooding. Anyone wanting to help can choose items from the list and send them to this address at checkout:

Scott’s Drum Center, C/O Flood Relief 4956 Johnston St, Lafayette, LA 70503.

Once the Louisiana teams on the ground receive the supplies, they distribute them to the families in need.

The Arkansas Young Republicans started the effort. When the Texas Young Republicans decided to lend a hand, the Texas Young Democrats reached out to president of the TYRs, John Baucum, to see if they could be of service.

‌Photo by Brian Smialowski/Getty Images.‌

According to TYD Communications Director Chelsea Roe, both groups have been working together in perfect bipartisan harmony since day one of the collaboration.

Roe believes being a younger generation is one reason why their cooperative efforts are working so well.

"We understand that a diversification of ideas is what makes us better as a human race," she said over email. "At the end of it all, that's what we have in common — we want to leave this world we live in a better place than it was when we came into it."

‌Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images. ‌

Baucum expressed similar sentiments to the Dallas Morning News: "At the end of the day, we all live and work together."

Our country might be divided when it comes to political beliefs, but in the face of a crisis, it's wonderful to see people putting those differences aside for the greater good.

Joy

Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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"Top Gun: Maverick" reviews are raving.

If you're anything like me, when you heard that a "Top Gun" sequel was being made nearly three decades after the original, you may have rolled your eyes a bit. I mean, come on. "Top Gun" was great, but who makes a sequel 30 years later and expects people to be excited? Especially considering how scrutinizing both audiences and critics tend to be with second films.

Then I saw a trailer for "Top Gun: Maverick," and was surprised that it looked … super not terrible. Then more and more details about the film emerged, then more trailers and behind-the-scenes footage were released, then early reviews started rolling in and … you guys. You guysssss. I don't know how the filmmakers managed to pull it off, but everything about this film looks absolutely incredible.

And frankly, as a member of Gen X who saw the original "Top Gun" at least a dozen times, I could not be more thrilled. We deserve this win. We've been through so much. Many of us have spent the better part of the past two decades raising our kids and then spent the prime of our middle age dealing with a pandemic on top of political and social upheaval. We've been forgotten more than once—shocker—in discussions on generation gaps and battles. So to have our late-'80s heartstrings plucked by an iconic opening melody and then taken into the danger zone in what reviewers are saying is the best blockbuster in decades? Yes, please.

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TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

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