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5 People Want You To Understand 5 Ways They See Red

Years ago, an HIV or AIDS diagnosis was a death sentence. The red ribbon was a symbol of so many lives lost. But living with HIV/AIDS isn't quite the same as it used to be, and today the iconic red ribbon is a reminder not just of the people we've lost, but of all the progress we've made and the lives we've saved since. These stories need our attention.

5 People Want You To Understand 5 Ways They See Red

HIV/AIDS resource site TheBody.com asked its users to use the hashtag #RedRemindsMe to explain what living with HIV/AIDS is like.

AARON LAXTON

Twitter: @AaronLaxton


#RedRemindsMe that I am standing on the shoulders of those who have come before me and fought to change a broken system of healthcare for those living with HIV and AIDS. Although quality of care has improved, new infections, threat of criminalization, and stigma still demand that we ACT UP, Fight Back and End AIDS.

PATRICK INGRAM

Twitter: @PlusLifeOfPat

Red Reminds Me of the first marathon I ever ran. I had fabulous friends who supported and ran with me as well as the resilience to complete 26.2 miles under 4:30:00. I then had the enthusiasm to run a second marathon two weeks later because I wanted to show people HIV does not hold me down. #RedRemindsMe

JACK MACKENROTH

Twitter @JackMackenroth

#RedRemindsMe of my work with Housing Works and Braking AIDS Ride and the importance of giving back to the #HIV community.

Maria Mejia

Twitter: @MariaHIVMejia

#RedRemindsMe of the true and unconditional love that I share with my wife, Lisa, of 8 years. We are a lesbian magnetic couple. She is the love of my life and my number one supporter. Disclosing my status was one of the hardest things, but I had to give her the option.

Jeremie “Ben B.” Rosley

Twitter: @JBRosley

If not for #HIV, I would have never discovered #healthy #adaptogens like #redtea #jujubes & #barberries. #RedRemindsMe of #RESEARCH

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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4-year-old New Zealand boy and police share toys.

Sometimes the adorableness of small children is almost too much to take.

According to the New Zealand Police, a 4-year-old called the country's emergency number to report that he had some toys for them—and that's only the first cute thing to happen in this story.

After calling 111 (the New Zealand equivalent to 911), the preschooler told the "police lady" who answered the call that he had some toys for her. "Come over and see them!" he said to her.

The dispatcher asked where he was, and then the boy's father picked up. He explained that the kids' mother was sick and the boy had made the call while he was attending to the other child. After confirming that there was no emergency—all in a remarkably calm exchange—the call was ended. The whole exchange was so sweet and innocent.

But then it went to another level of wholesome. The dispatcher put out a call to the police units asking if anyone was available to go look at the 4-year-old's toys. And an officer responded in the affirmative as if this were a totally normal occurrence.

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