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21 memes that everyone who grew up in the '90s totally understands

This was what the 1990s was like.

1990s memes, gen x memes, '90s nostalgia

The 1990s was a magical time.

If you grew up in the '90s then you were part of the last generation of kids who lived without being constantly connected to the internet. You lived during that last gasp of the analog era where most of your entertainment came on tape and if you wanted a new pair of Guess jeans or LA Gear shoes, you had to drive to the mall.

Also, if you wore parachute pant, aka "Hammer Pants," people actually thought you were cool.


Families mattered on Friday nights.

People listened to rock 'n' roll because it was important.

Hip-hop was at its peak.

People spent time talking to each other instead of staring at their phones.

It was a time of hope and optimism.

Some folks over at Reddit have been sharing funny memes that explain exactly what life was like in the '90s. From the terrible pastel-colored designs that were everywhere to the charming, but antiquated, technology kids today will never understand.

Here are 19 of the best memes from r/90s/.

1. 1992 was 30 years ago

via u/TBHMC

Sorry, if that made you feel old.

2. "Go! Go!" (Fill in the blank)

via u/phill080891

This person is living the Gen X dream.

3. Oh snap!

via u/pszjumwg

There was no greater diss in 1991.

4. Make a run for the border

via u/phill080891

Does this picture make you instinctively think "You quiero Taco Bell"?

5. In the '90s, every night was a Blockbuster night

u/chill2308

It's like looking back in time.

6. We'll always have Chuck E. Cheese's

via u/KazuChuu

Our immune systems were forged through miles of sweaty PVC.

7. Don't touch the 'purple stuff' 

via u/zraptorguard

Ingredients: Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup and 2% or Less of: Concentrated Orange Juice, Concentrated Tangerine Juice, Concentrated Apple Juice, Concentrated Lime Juice, Concentrated Grapefruit Juice, Concentrated Pear Juice, Citric Acid, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Thiamin Hydrochloride (Vitamin B1), Natural Flavor, Modified Cornstarch, Canola Oil, Sodium Citrate, Cellulose Gum, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Neotame, Sodium Hexametaphosphate, Potassium Sorbate to Protect Flavor, Yellow 5, Yellow 6.

8. These actually existed

via u/Papash

How in the world did they cram 25 different colored pens into one super writing utensil?

9. Nu metal didn't last long

via u/TonyB973

A.D.I.D.A.S.

10. People aged quickly in the '90s

via u/IrieSunshine

This is what happens when you have children.

11. This weighed 25 pounds and went everywhere you went 

via u/mikerockitjones

I can still hear the sound of the rumpling plastic as I flip through the pages.

12. They got 'Jerry Maguire'? 

via u/afzalwas

Of course they have "Jerry Maguire." In fact, they have 500 copies of "Jerry Maguire."

13. The hippest computer lab ever

via u/DataDuude

After the iMac dropped, only vertified dorks used an IBM.

14. Just looking at this hurts

via u/90sAreStillAllThat

This may have hurt your fingers, but was probably safer than licking the battery to see if it still had "juice."

15. It's like they didn't want you to play solitaire

via u/drinkinswish


Solitaire wasted more people's time in 1998 than Instagram does in 2022.

16. In 1993 this could cure anything

via u/SnooPies7080

Stomach ache? Flu? Munchausen's syndrome? This unique combination would have you back on your feet in no time.

17. Synergy

via u/FlintTheDad

To quote a popular philosopher from the '90s, they went together like "peas and carrots."

18. This cup went perfect with pizza

via u/ThEhIsO8730

If the joint had all-you-can-drink refills, you drank 'em out of this cup. It held tokens, too.

19. The only pattern that mattered in the '90s

via u/BarefutR

Throw on those shorts, then hop in your Miata and get yourself some action!


This article originally appeared on 01.06.22

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