10 Tweets Say Exactly What Needs To Be Said About What Just Went Down In Pakistan

Pakistan suffered a horrid tragedy: a school shooting perpetrated by extremist militants in the name of a verryyyyy extreme interpretation of "religious" dogma.

Just hearing about it, comedian Kumail Nanjiani (you've seen him on TV), himself a Muslim originally from Pakistan and now living in L.A., reacted.


What Nanjiani is doing is a truly great representation of what it's like to see people like you, or who you care about, or who could even be loved ones ... killed.

You'd feel mad. Sad. Confused. Helpless. Misrepresented. And eager to share some illuminating factoids. Lucky for us, Nanjiani did just that.

#RealTalk #ReallyUpsetting

This is the best part. In tragedies, I *always* admire those who call on us to walk in another's shoes.

While this was breaking news on Dec. 16, 2014 .... Twitter was oddly silent.

In my opinion, there's a part of American culture that "just accepts" this kind of violence ... especially in places like Pakistan. We're immune to it because we view that violence as just so common.

Why are we unsurprised when certain cultures experience violence? Stereotypes we don't question and a lack of role models in the world who actively show us that extremes are exactly that: stereotypes.

I'm sure we've all been judged based on a stereotype about us. I'm sure we've all been there when someone, some place, or some thing that we relate to gets judged based on a stereotype. It's frustrating, to say the very least.

What do you see when you imagine a Muslim man? Any stereotypes you'd like to check?

This is where knowledge is dropped.

And this is where I wonder why more news shows don't point this out.

The Pakistani government's reputation is so warped that it chose to come out and say that it doesn't support crimes like this attack on schoolchildren.

This part — where he talks about his home — is sad but also bittersweet.

Have you ever been away from somewhere special to you and seen bad things happen? How do you feel?

More comedians with deep things to say, please.

Maybe if more people see this anguish, we can come together to stop tweets like this — or, more importantly, massacres like this — from ever happening again.

It's worth a try.

#PrayForPeshawar

This article originally appeared on 01.09.18


Why should a superintendent get a raise while teachers in the same district struggling to make ends meet see their paychecks flatline — year after year after year?

Teacher Deyshia Hargrave begged the question. Minutes later, she was handcuffed and placed in the backseat of a cop car.

The scene was captured below by YouTube user Chris Rosa, who attended a board meeting for Vermilion Parish Schools in Louisiana.

You can watch Hargrave begin speaking about 33 seconds in. The situation starts becoming contentious around 6:35 minutes. Hargrave is arrested at 8:35, and then walked outside in handcuffs and placed in the back of police vehicle. (Story continues below.)



"We work very hard with very little to maintain the salaries that we have," Hargrave, who teaches middle school language arts, said during a public comment portion of the meeting, stating that she's seen classroom sizes balloon during her time at the school with no increased compensation. "We're meeting those goals, while someone in that position of leadership [the superintendent] is getting raise? It's a sad, sad day to be a teacher in Vermilion Parish."

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