They Did A Study To See How Women Are Treated In Comments. The Results Will Shock You. Except Not.

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Comments on the Internets can be treacherous. For women, it's a little worse. At 1:30, she explains the difference in the comments that men get versus women. It's not a surprise, at all. Seriously. At all.

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Science proves that YouTube commenters are just the worst. They said it, not me!

0:11

Hey guys, Tara here for Dnews - with DEFINITIVE PROOF that YouTube trolls exist, science has

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proven it, officially - and it is out of my hands!

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A study published in PLOS One this week, conducted an extensive analysis of TED Talks, to see

0:24

if comments on the YouTube version of them differed from comments on the TED Talks website.

0:29

Now if you're unfamiliar with TED talks, they are a collection of recorded conferences covering

0:33

every intellectual topic imaginable - but always with a very inspiring slant. And they're

0:38

super informative, so one might expect the comments on them to be on-topic or, dare we

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say, even positive. But once again, science has proven us wrong.

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For their study, a team of researchers looked at 595 different TED talks relating to science

0:53

and technology, which currently account for around two-thirds of all TED talks. And they

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looked at the comments on each video, comparing those on the YouTube platform, to ones on

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the Ted.com version.

1:02

They found that 72% of the comments on the Ted.com videos were related to the actual

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content of the talk - while only 57% of comments on the YouTube version were relevant. Even

1:12

less surprising, 5.7% of the comments on YouTube were personal insults, compared to less than

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1% on Ted.com.

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The study also looked at the disparity of comments on talks featuring female presenters,

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versus ones featuring males. And while there were no differences in the number of negative

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or positive comments related to the actual subject matter - female presenters did tend

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to elicit more emotional responses than males, whether positive and negative.

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Perhaps most interesting, the study found that commenters were significantly more likely

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to discuss a female presenter's looks - than they were for a male-hosted talk. SAY IT ISN'T

1:46

SO, YOUTUBE!

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In fact, the only advantage YouTube had over Ted.com was that people were more likely

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to engage with one another in the comments. And it's not clear whether personal insults

1:57

actually count as "engagement," but at this point - nothing would surprise me.

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Now I thought this study was very interesting, so I did some research myself - and looked

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at all 984 comments on this YouTube video about the science of flirting - a topic that's

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sure to attract only the nicest and most socially capable of individuals.

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Turns out - it's scientifically impossible to read through 984 comments on a YouTube

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video - it just can't be done. So my study was inconclusive, BUT on the bright side - several

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people did say that I look like a man, soooo......there's that.

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You know what, I'm gonna start an anti-trolling movement. The next time you leave a comment

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on YouTube, I want you to write the kindest, most overwhelmingly positive thing you can

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think of. Even if it's not true. And you can start with this video. Please. I really need

2:41

this.

There may be small errors in this transcript.
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"The Science of Internet Comments" is brought to you by the science friendly folks at Discovery News. You should leave them very nice comments. You can read the study they are talking about here.

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