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You can use your smartphone to determine if your child has a deadly form of cancer. Here's how.

We take pics of our kids because they're cute. We can also do it to detect cancer.

You can use your smartphone to determine if your child has a deadly form of cancer. Here's how.

Retinoblastoma is a dangerous form of cancer.

While retinoblastoma is a rare form of cancer, it's actually the most common eye cancer that affects children. It generally develops in children under 4 years old, and 18 months is the average age of diagnosis.

The good news is that when it's caught early, retinoblastoma is highly treatable. Early detection can save a child's vision — and their life because when retinoblastoma advances and spreads, it can be deadly.


You can easily check to see if your child has it.

Retinoblastoma can often be detected with a photo because the flash can cause the pupil to turn white if it's present.

So pull out your cellphone, turn on the flash, and snap a photo of your kiddo. It's that simple. If you see white in one or both of your child's pupils unexplained by lighting conditions — especially if you've noticed other retinoblastoma symptoms like squinting or lazy eye, redness or swelling not due to infection, a change in iris color, or vision loss — schedule an appointment with their doctor immediately.

Share this with your friends and family members who have kids. We all know we parents take excessive photos of our little ones, so let's make sure we all realize that in addition to preserving memories, we could save their vision — or their lives!

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Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday are teaming up to find the people who lead with love everyday.

Know someone in your neighborhood who's known for their optimistic attitude, commitment to bettering their community and always leading with love? Tell us about them for the chance to win a $2,000 grant to keep doing good in their community.

Nomination ends November 22, 2020

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Americans are more interested in politics than ever these days. More voted in the 2020 election than in any other in the past 100 years. Over 65% of the voting-eligible cast a ballot in the contentious fight between Joe Biden and Donald Trump.

"People are very excited and paying attention even though there are all this bad news and high 'wrong track' numbers in the country," Nancy Zdunkewicz, managing editor at Democracy Corps, told The Hill.

It's wonderful to see that a greater number of Americans are standing up to be counted and demanding their voices be heard. But it's also the symptom of a deep level of discontent many people feel about their country.

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A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
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While generational stereotypes don't apply to everyone, there are significant differences between how Baby Boomers (1944 to 1964), Gen X (1965 to 1980), and Millenials (1981 to 1996) were raised.

Baby Boomers tended to grow up in homes where one parent stayed home and the other worked outside of the house. Millennials are known for having over-involved "helicopter" parents.

Then, there's Gen X.

The smaller, cooler generation that, according to a 2004 marketing study "went through its all-important, formative years as one of the least parented, least nurtured generations in U.S. history."

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The U.S. Surgeon General credits the new surge in COVID cases to "pandemic fatigue," but it's nothing compared to what healthcare workers on the frontlines are going through. TIME recently reported that nurses are experiencing burnout, but it often goes unseen. A nurse recently employed a social media trend to draw attention to the behind the scenes fatigue.

An ICU nurse posted her own "how it started/how it's going" photo on Twitter, and long story short, it's not going that great. The before photo of Kathryn, an ICU nurse in Nashville, was taken in the middle of April right after she completed nursing school. The after photo revealed just how much literal sweat and tears healthcare workers put in while treating people during the pandemic.


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