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Campbell Soup Company announced a revised chicken noodle soup recipe.

They say they're giving the people what they want by leaving out ingredients that sound straight out of a chemistry lab.

But the recipe won't debut in Campbell's classic red and white can:


Photo by Cassandra Corrado, professional soup can photographer, for Upworthy.

They're rolling it out with limited-edition "Star Wars"-themed soup. They appear to be testing the recipe in the children's variety of the product while hedging their risk with the galactic merchandising bonanza surrounding "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" (in theaters in December 2015).

Photo by theimpulsivebuy/Flickr.

According to The New York Times, Campbell's soup sales have been falling since 2012. Between those financial pressures and the reputation of an 81-year-old product at stake, it makes sense that Campbell wants the force on their side.

But this isn't the only brand shake-up Campbell has had this year.

The company produced a collection of videos for an ad campaign aimed at delighting the country's diverse soup consumers. One video starred a little boy eating Campbell's "Star Wars"-themed soup — with his two dads.

GIFs from Campbell's Soup/YouTube.

Homophobes were not delighted. But the company stood by the video (and the law), staking its position as an ally of the gay community. Plus, with the majority of Americans supportive of gay marriage, that's also just good business.

So here's the scoop — or the ladle, rather — on Campbell's new soup recipe.

The new recipe eliminates most of the ingredients you wouldn't normally find in a household kitchen.

“We're closing the gap between the kitchen and our plants," Campbell Soup Company CEO Denise Morrison told The New York Times.

Photo by Cassandra Corrado for Upworthy.

The once 30-ingredient list is now 20. Among the departed are flavor enhancers like monosodium glutamate, disodium inosinate, and disodium guanylate, as well as texture additives like maltodextrin and preservatives like lactic acid.

Marketers call what's happening in the food industry a "clean label" revolution.

Photo by Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images.

In an interview with NPR, Jeff George, who works in research and development for Campbell Soup Company, said that's precisely what's driving the company's decision:

"The change we're seeing from moms and dads and kids, is they want foods with simpler, easy, understandable ingredients, cleaner ingredients. So we're changing our formulas."

Campbell and other processed-food conglomerates are a few decades late to the party. The "clean label" trend isn't exactly new. A report published in 1997 cited the health concerns of an aging population as a key motivator of the trend.

But today, companies like Campbell are listening to the youngsters. Morrison points to the 75 million millennials, the largest age demographic in the United States. "They're shopping and thinking differently about food and in a way that is influential," she said.

It's great that Campbell is finally heeding consumer demand.

But if food companies really want to serve this increasingly powerful young consumer group, they'll either need to speed things along or surrender market share to newcomers who will. The millennial economy is an on-demand economy, and they're not waiting 20 years for the soup they want now.

Health

A child’s mental health concerns shouldn’t be publicized no matter who their parents are

Even politicians' children deserve privacy during a mental health crisis.

A child's mental health concerns shouldn't be publicized.

Editor's Note: If you are having thoughts about taking your own life, or know of anyone who is in need of help, the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline is a United States-based suicide prevention network of over 200+ crisis centers that provides 24/7 service via a toll-free hotline with the number 9-8-8. It is available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress.


It's an unspoken rule that children of politicians should be off limits when it comes to public figure status. Kids deserve the ability to simply be kids without the media picking them apart. We saw this during Obama's presidency when people from both ends of the political spectrum come out to defend Malia and Sasha Obama's privacy and again when a reporter made a remark about Barron Trump.

This is even more important when we are talking about a child's mental health, so seeing detailed reports about Ted Cruz's 14-year-old child's private mental health crisis was offputting, to say it kindly. It feels icky for me to even put the senator's name in this article because it feels like adding to this child's exposure.

When a child is struggling with mental health concerns, the instinct should be to cocoon them in safety, not to highlight the details or speculate on the cause. Ever since the news broke about this child's mental health, social media has been abuzz, mostly attacking the parents and speculating if the child is a member of the LGBTQ community.

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Famous writers shared their book signing woes with a disheartened new author.

Putting creative work out into the world to be evaluated and judged is nerve-wracking enough as it is. Having to market your work, especially if you're not particularly extroverted or sales-minded, is even worse.

So when you're a newly published author holding a book signing and only two of the dozens of people who RSVP'd show up, it's disheartening if not devastating. No matter how much you tell yourself "people are just busy," it feels like a rejection of you and your work.

Debut novelist Chelsea Banning recently experienced this scenario firsthand, and her sharing it led to an amazing deluge of support and solidarity—not only from other aspiring authors, but from some of the top names in the writing business.

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This article originally appeared on 04.15.19


On May 28, 2014, 13-year-old Athena Orchard of Leicester, England, died of bone cancer. The disease began as a tumor in her head and eventually spread to her spine and left shoulder. After her passing, Athena's parents and six siblings were completely devastated. In the days following her death, her father, Dean, had the difficult task of going through her belongings. But the spirits of the entire Orchard family got a huge boost when he uncovered a secret message written by Athena on the backside of a full-length mirror.

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This article originally appeared on 01.22.19


The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn't have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women's rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

Then there are those of us in the messy middle. Those who believe that life begins at conception, that abortion isn't something we'd choose—and we'd hope others wouldn't choose—under most circumstances, yet who choose to vote to keep abortion legal.

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