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Why Campbell Soup Company is changing the recipe for a version of its most iconic product.

Campbell Soup Company announced a revised chicken noodle soup recipe.

They say they're giving the people what they want by leaving out ingredients that sound straight out of a chemistry lab.

But the recipe won't debut in Campbell's classic red and white can:


Photo by Cassandra Corrado, professional soup can photographer, for Upworthy.

They're rolling it out with limited-edition "Star Wars"-themed soup. They appear to be testing the recipe in the children's variety of the product while hedging their risk with the galactic merchandising bonanza surrounding "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" (in theaters in December 2015).

Photo by theimpulsivebuy/Flickr.

According to The New York Times, Campbell's soup sales have been falling since 2012. Between those financial pressures and the reputation of an 81-year-old product at stake, it makes sense that Campbell wants the force on their side.

But this isn't the only brand shake-up Campbell has had this year.

The company produced a collection of videos for an ad campaign aimed at delighting the country's diverse soup consumers. One video starred a little boy eating Campbell's "Star Wars"-themed soup — with his two dads.

GIFs from Campbell's Soup/YouTube.

Homophobes were not delighted. But the company stood by the video (and the law), staking its position as an ally of the gay community. Plus, with the majority of Americans supportive of gay marriage, that's also just good business.

So here's the scoop — or the ladle, rather — on Campbell's new soup recipe.

The new recipe eliminates most of the ingredients you wouldn't normally find in a household kitchen.

“We're closing the gap between the kitchen and our plants," Campbell Soup Company CEO Denise Morrison told The New York Times.

Photo by Cassandra Corrado for Upworthy.

The once 30-ingredient list is now 20. Among the departed are flavor enhancers like monosodium glutamate, disodium inosinate, and disodium guanylate, as well as texture additives like maltodextrin and preservatives like lactic acid.

Marketers call what's happening in the food industry a "clean label" revolution.

Photo by Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images.

In an interview with NPR, Jeff George, who works in research and development for Campbell Soup Company, said that's precisely what's driving the company's decision:

"The change we're seeing from moms and dads and kids, is they want foods with simpler, easy, understandable ingredients, cleaner ingredients. So we're changing our formulas."

Campbell and other processed-food conglomerates are a few decades late to the party. The "clean label" trend isn't exactly new. A report published in 1997 cited the health concerns of an aging population as a key motivator of the trend.

But today, companies like Campbell are listening to the youngsters. Morrison points to the 75 million millennials, the largest age demographic in the United States. "They're shopping and thinking differently about food and in a way that is influential," she said.

It's great that Campbell is finally heeding consumer demand.

But if food companies really want to serve this increasingly powerful young consumer group, they'll either need to speed things along or surrender market share to newcomers who will. The millennial economy is an on-demand economy, and they're not waiting 20 years for the soup they want now.

The grandmother was suspicious.

A grandmother always felt her middle granddaughter Lindsay, 15, looked slightly different from the rest of the family because she had blonde, curly hair, while the rest of her siblings’ hair was dark “I thought genetics was being weird and I love her,” she wrote on Reddit’s AITA forum.

But things became serious after Linday’s parents “banned” her from taking things a step further and getting a DNA test. If the family was sure their daughter was theirs, why would they forbid her from seeking clarity in the situation? After the parents laid down the law, the situation started to seem a little suspicious.

“I told my son and [daughter-in-law] that there was something fishy around her birth she needed to know. They denied it and told me to leave it alone,” the grandma wrote.

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via Merkur.de

MRI image of an opera singer, singing.

A great opera voice is a learned art, not a natural-born gift like other styles of singing. It takes discipline, physical training, and to truly wow the audience, the performer must be a great actor and athlete as well.

"Singing opera is to ordinary vocal activity what distance running, triple-jumping and pole-vaulting are to ordinary exercise," said Sir Antonio Pappano, music director of the Royal Opera House wrote for the BBC. "Which means that singers and, almost as important, those who teach them are locked in the same kinds of relationship that obtain between elite athletes and charismatic coaches."

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Tawny Platis's voice acting demonstration is blowing people's minds.

In the age of television, radio, and the internet, we hear voices all the time, pretty much everywhere we go. From advertisements to customer service prompts to video narrations, voiceovers have become so commonplace that we don't give them much thought.

That is, until we see someone actually doing those voices we're so accustomed to hearing.

Professional voice actor Tawny Platis shared a video to her Tiktok demonstrating 10 voices most of us will instantly recognize, and it's as uncanny as it is impressive. She seamlessly transitions from a text-to-speech voice to a "detached casual conversation" voice to a bright "We've got denim for the whole family!" department store voice and more.

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What to do when you're the child of an alcoholic

My dad was an addict, and growing up with him taught me a lot.

Photo with permission from writer Ashley Tieperman.

Ashley Tieperman and her father.


There was never just one moment in my family when we “found out" that my dad was an addict.

I think I always knew, but I never saw him actually drinking. Usually, he downed a fifth of vodka before he came home from work or hid tiny bottles in the garage and bathroom cabinets.

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This story first appeared on the author's Medium and is reprinted here with permission.

Because you're a girl.

I was promoted a few weeks ago, which was great. I got a lot of nice notes from friends, family, customers, partners, and random strangers, which was exciting.

But it wasn't long until a note came in saying, “Everyone knows you got the position because you're a girl." In spite of having a great week at a great company with great people whom I love, that still stung, because it's not the first time I've heard it.

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“The greater the artist, the greater the doubt. Perfect confidence is granted to the less talented as a consolation prize." ― Robert Hughes

Great artists tend to live life swimming in a vast ocean of self-doubt. It's that special blend of insecurity and perfectionism that fuels their desire to hone their craft and get better with each piece.

But that self-doubt can also be paralyzing and prevent potential artists from picking up the pen, paintbrush or guitar.

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