Over the past 20 years or so, women have made a lot of progress.

Worldwide, the gap between school enrollment rates for boys and girls has shrunk, and in many parts of the world, there are actually more women than men enrolled in college.



Despite gains, they've still struggled in other areas — specifically, in the workplace.

20 years ago, 0 women were CEOs in Fortune 500 companies. Now? 5%

While that's certainly better than nothing — 5%? We can do better than that, world.

Technically, it's illegal to pay men and women different wages for the same work.

As Batgirl here pointed out in a 1973 PSA, it's not okay that Robin gets paid more than she does for doing the same job.

In 1963, President John F. Kennedy signed the Equal Pay Act into law, designed to end gender-based wage discrimination.

"I am delighted today to approve the Equal Pay Act of 1963, which prohibits arbitrary discrimination against women in the payment of wages. This act represents many years of effort by labor, management, and several private organizations unassociated with labor or management, to call attention to the unconscionable practice of paying female employees less wages than male employees for the same job."
President John F. Kennedy, June 10, 1963

The law was hard to enforce and, as a result, never quite lived up to its goal. More than 50 years later, little progress has been made.

It's hard to get specific about what the wage gap is in terms of a percentage of lost wages, but one thing can be agreed on: It exists.

Some have said that women make just 78% of what men make. Others say the number is closer to 82% or 87%.

Still, it's really not cool that women make anything less than 100% of what men make for doing the same work.

On top of that, studies have found that women of color are at even more of a disadvantage when it comes to earnings.

It's unacceptable, and as time goes on, people continue to brainstorm ideas for closing the wage gap.

Solutions have ranged from the practical — such as putting an end to "salary secrecy" — to the more out there, like simply making an effort to pay women more and men less.

In 2009, the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act became law, making it easier for women to sue for pay discrimination. Still, more needs to be done.

Because, like Batgirl, if you're doing the same work as a man, you really should be making the same salary as a man.

Check out this video put together by the U.S. Department of Labor featuring footage from the 1973 Batgirl PSA:

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