+
Most Shared

What it's like to live in Southern Africa's worst drought in 35 years.

'We cannot risk losing an entire generation of children to the drought.'

True
Gates Foundation: The Story of Food

Rita Mazivehad never touched a camera before, but she knew she needed to document the situation she was in.  

“I have never used a camera before, and I have neither seen myself in a photo or in a mirror,” the 43-year-old from Mozambique told the global development organization CARE.

‌‌Rita Mazive. Image via Johanna Mitscherlich/CARE.‌‌


Rita is one of 40 million people in Southern Africa trying to survive the worst drought in 35 years.

Thanks for nothing, El Niño.

El Niño, the climate cycle in the Pacific Ocean that has a global impact on weather patterns, has rocked Southern Africa — specifically Mozambique, Madagascar, Zimbabwe, and Malawi. The region usually receives rain between October and April, but because of El Niño, the 2015-2016 season rains didn't fall until late-February.

In an area where 70% of the population depends on agriculture, you can imagine the predicament millions of families are facing: severe food shortages.

The realities of drought and food insecurity are hard to grasp when you've never experienced them. So CARE wants to give people around the world a glimpse into the lives of those who have.

El Niño: Through the lens of hunger” is a photo project that shows what life is like in an extreme drought, through the eyes of those living it.

Step 1 for the project's volunteers: learn how to use a camera. Step 2: go about your day.

‌‌Mira and Olga, two young mothers in Mozambique. Image via Joao Lambo/CARE. ‌‌

Each volunteer provides their own unique focus behind the lens. Through photos, they show insights into life in their communities — as they also suffer from food shortages — and their volunteer work with CARE, counseling community members and providing crucial health and hygiene information to them.

In the project, the images show the sacrifices families are forced to make.

‌Many older people are taking care of their grandchildren, because the children's parents have left to find work elsewhere because of the drought. ‌Image via Rita Mazive/CARE.

Such as how hard it is to put education first.

Many girls get up before dawn to find firewood and sell it, struggling to earn 5-10 cents per day for their families. Some still attend school, but often cannot make it in the lengthy time it takes to collect firewood and get to school. Image via Rita Mazive/CARE.

Especially when it takes two hours to walk to school.

These friends in second grade walk two hours to school and two hours back home every day. The secondary school is even further, which results in many kids dropping out after primary school.

It's not easy to learn on an empty stomach.

Many kids go to school on an empty stomach, making it hard to concentrate.. "We have only enough food for one meal at 5pm, when he returns from his classes," said one mother.

And it's still important for kids to be ... kids.

"It is very important for their development," said volunteer Tereza Titosse. "I have six children myself, and I know how difficult it sometimes is to keep up the energy to engage them. But we cannot risk losing an entire generation of children to the drought.”‌ Image via Hortencia Jacinto/CARE.

The images show the increasing focus on safe water...

CARE volunteers teach families to cover their drinking water and use a trowel to help stop dirt and leaves from falling into it. Unclean water is a major reason kids get sick.  Image via Joao Lambo/CARE.

Even though it can take a daily eight-mile-walk to find it.

18-year-old Erleia walks 14 kilometers to fetch water every day. Image via Rita Mazive/CARE.

Not to mention the 11+ miles to find wild fruits to eat.

‌Laura walks for 18 kilometers to find wild fruits like tindhzulo and wild leaves of cacana.‌ Image via Artur Tafula/CARE.

Traveling long distances can create a dangerous situation for women and girls.

There's an increased risk of sexual and gender-based violenceas girlsneed to travel ever increasing distances in search of water and food, especially when it gets dark. Image via Paulina Filipe/CARE.

‌‌The images show what people in these communities eat now.

Wild leaves and fruits are a go-to. Image via Rita Mazive/CARE.

And how they prepare it.

"I dry the tindhzulo fruit for two to four days in the sun. Usually we use peanuts, but that is not available because of the drought. I then crush the dried fruits to prepare and cook them." Image via Artur Tafula/CARE.

But, most importantly, the images show that these communities are doing the best they can with what they have.

Image via Hortencia Jacinto/CARE.

"I know it’s difficult for people in Europe or the U.S. to understand what this drought actually means for us," said CARE volunteer Artur Tafula. "With my photos, I want to show what people eat, how long they have to walk to find food, how they process wild fruits and leaves, and just how much time and effort is required to make it through another day.”

The times are tough, but they can, and will, get better.

Organizations like CARE are working with volunteers and community members to minimize the impact of the drought and to help get people back on their feet. Some of the steps being taken are as simple as focusing on safe water and sanitation and good hygiene practices.

Broken water systems are being repaired and communities are becoming more prepared for reoccurring disasters. Farmersare learning drought-resistant agricultural techniques, and they're being introduced to alternative sources oflivelihood and income too.

Image via Tereza Titosse/CARE.

These are all ways to move forward, but there's a lot more that needs to be done. A better understanding of the situation in Southern Africa is the first place to start.CARE's photo project, letting the stories come from the source, is a genuine  way to help close the awareness gap.

"I hope that many people will stop seeing El Niño and the drought as something abstract, and start seeing the situation through the eyes of the volunteers," wrote CARE representative Adérito Bie.

The next generation is counting on it.

Images provided by Pacifico

Making waves in the best way

True

At last, summer is here. And for many people, that means it's time for heading to the beach and maybe even catching some waves. Surfing is a quintessential summertime activity for those who live in coastal communities—it’s not only really fun and challenging, it’s also a great way to celebrate Mother Nature’s beauty. Even after a wipeout, the cool water mixed with warm sunshine offers a certain kind of euphoria. Or, you know, just hanging back on the sand is plenty fun too. Simply being outdoors near the ocean is its own reward.

pacifico quiksilver beach cleanupLet’s protect the places where outdoor adventure happensAll photos provided by Pacifico

However, it's well known that our beautiful beaches are suffering the consequences of overcrowding, pollution and littering. What was once a way of playing in nature is now slowly destroying it. And of course, this affects beachgoers everywhere. The sad truth is—without taking action to preserve all the natural joys the earth provides, we will eventually lose them.

But there is hope. Two popular brands that both have roots in surf culture have teamed up to help make trips to the beach a more sustainable pastime. The best part? You don’t have to know how to hang ten in order to participate.

Pacifico®, a pilsner-style lager originally brought to the U.S. by surfers, and Quiksilver, an iconic apparel company loved by both surfers and beach goers alike, have created a brand-new range of clothing and accessories with sustainability in mind.

Take a look below. These threads are great for all kinds of fun in the sun, without compromising the environment.

pacifico quicksilver beach cleanupsReady to make some waves

The collection launches on July 5 and includes tees and woven shirts, boardshorts, hats, flip-flops and a special beach towel and tote bag. The unique collaboration features the vibrant, colorful designs that are the hallmark of Quiksilver combined with Pacifico elements, created to make a positive impact.

Each item has been thoughtfully curated to minimize an environmental footprint and protect the outdoors. The hats, for example, are made from NetPlus® by Bureo®, a raw material created from South American recycled fishing nets. Additionally, the board shorts are made from recycled plastic bottles, and tees are made with 100% organic cotton. Pretty rad stuff, to put it in surfer lingo.

The prices on these pieces are equally rad, ranging from $28 flip-flops to $60 boardshorts.

In keeping with the sustainable ethos and protecting the places we play, Pacifico and Quiksilver will celebrate the products’ launch by hosting two beach cleanups. The first is on July 5 at Sunset Point in Malibu, California, from 4-5:30pm, and the second is on July 9th at Deerfield Beach in Florida from 8:30 – 10:30am.

pacifico quicksilver clothing lineCleaning up and looking good while doing it

Theses beach cleanups are open to anyone over the age of 21 who’s ready to have some fun while taking care of nature’s playground.

Those who can’t make it to the beach (bummer, dude) don’t have to miss out on all the fun. The new collection will be available on July 5th at www.quiksilver.com/mens-collab-pacifico. And even if you don’t surf, never plan to surf, have no desire to even be near a surfboard, rest assured, the apparel is still cool. Plus sustainable choices are always good fashion.

Our planet provides us with an endless supply of beauty and adventure. But without more mindful actions from humanity, its natural wonders will eventually diminish. Fortunately Pacifico and Quiksilver are making it easier than ever for people to enjoy the great outdoors without jeopardizing it. That’s a wave worth riding.

This article originally appeared on 09.06.17


Being married is like being half of a two-headed monster. It's impossible to avoid regular disagreements when you're bound to another person for the rest of your life. Even the perfect marriage (if there was such a thing) would have its daily frustrations. Funnily enough, most fights aren't caused by big decisions but the simple, day-to-day questions, such as "What do you want for dinner?"; "Are we free Friday night?"; and "What movie do you want to see?"

Here are some hilarious tweets that just about every married couple will understand.

Keep ReadingShow less

The dog lovers in your neighborhood.

Is there anything that dogs can’t improve? They make us healthier, happier and even more attractive. That’s right. If you have a photo with your dog in a dating profile people are more likely to swipe right.

Now, a new study reported by Ohio State News shows that having more dogs in your neighborhood can make you safer by lowering the overall crime rate.

The study, conducted by sociologists at Ohio State, was recently published in the journal Social Forces.

According to researchers, dog-walking isn’t just about getting exercise—it makes us all security guards whether we know it or not.

“People walking their dogs are essentially patrolling their neighborhoods,” Nicolo Pinchak, lead author of the study, told Ohio State News. “They see when things are not right, and when there are suspect outsiders in the area. It can be a crime deterrent.”

Keep ReadingShow less
Photo by Syed Ali on Unsplash

Mosquitoes are attracted to certain viral smells in both humans and mice.

As much as I love summer, there is one thing I could do without: bugs. More specifically, mosquitoes. Those pesky little buggers can wreak havoc on a beautiful summer day. Who hasn't spent time outside in summer and then come in all itchy and covered in bites? There are multiple reasons why some people are more susceptible to mosquito bites than others, but there's a new one that likely isn't on people's radars. Mosquitoes could be attracted to the odor certain viruses create in the body.

There is evidence that mosquitoes are attracted to the odor given off by mice infected by the parasite that causes malaria. Now, a team is looking at how the scent of mosquito-borne viruses such as dengue and Zika would attract mosquitoes to people rather than mice.

Keep ReadingShow less