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We've watched them come out, fall in love, become allies, and get married. It's now the law. Wow.

You've probably already seen some of these clips over the last five years. They still bring a tear to my eye. With maybe a fist-in-the-air, "Hellsyeah!"

Celebrations and rainbow flags broke out after the Supreme Court ruled that marriage equality is the law of the land.

But for many years leading up to that decision, thousands of people took to YouTube and social media to come out as gay and trans, to show their support as allies, and to work at making change happen. With each step, things got better.

Here are just a few that you might remember from along the way.

As a straight ally who works in social media, I've seen about half of these. They touch me to my core to this day — partly because of the courage it took for these people to make these clips and partly because of the raw emotion they express.


So sit back and remember the road we walked — together — to make this happen.

There's Ingrid Nilsen, Connor Franta, Troye Sivan, and Janet Mock.

All images via YouTube.

There are even more celebrities (and some who became famous soon after).

There's Laverne Cox, Ellen Page, Ellen DeGeneres, and Zach Wahls, an Eagle Scout and straight ally from Iowa who got 30 bazillion hits for his speech in front of his state's legislature.

There are even members of the military.

Remember this soldier and the heartwarming reaction he got from his dad?

All of these people added up to one beautiful movement that made this happen.

Thanks, everybody, for what you do every day to help make things better for everybody.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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via Pixabay

Happy pumpkin season.

We celebrate Thanksgiving on the fourth Thursday in November in the United States. The big focus on that day is the massive feast, football and maybe a little talk about pilgrims and Native Americans breaking bread together.

But, aside from a possible prayer at dinner, are many people focusing on the most essential part of the holiday: being thankful?

Amy Latta, a mother and craft expert, noticed the disconnect between the holiday and its meaning in 2012 so she created a new family tradition, the Thankful Pumpkin. The idea came to her after she went to a pumpkin patch with her son, Noah, who was 3 at the time.

“We need to stop and focus and be intentional about counting our blessings. To help do that in our family, we started the tradition of the Thankful Pumpkin,” she wrote on her blog. “All you need to make one is a pumpkin and a permanent marker and a heart full of gratitude.”

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This article originally appeared on 09.08.16


92-year-old Norma had a strange and heartbreaking routine.

Every night around 5:30 p.m., she stood up and told the staff at her Ohio nursing home that she needed to leave. When they asked why, she said she needed to go home to take care of her mother. Her mom, of course, had long since passed away.

Behavior like Norma's is quite common for older folks suffering from Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia. Walter, another man in the same assisted living facility, demanded breakfast from the staff every night around 7:30.

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