The homepage for the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity Resources, aka Donald Trump's "voter fraud" commission, contains the following instruction:

"Any member of the public wishing to submit written comments for the Commission’s consideration may do so via email at ElectionIntegrityStaff@ovp.eop.gov. Please note that the Commission may post such written comments publicly on our website, including names and contact information that are submitted."

The committee was established in the wake of Trump's unsubstantiated claim that "millions" voted illegally in the 2016 election with the goal of investigating voter impersonation.

Trump with commission co-chair Kris Kobach. Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images.


Between June 29 and July 11, the commission, chaired by Vice President Mike Pence and former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, received nearly 100 emails from voters.

True to their word, they posted them publicly — without redacting names or e-mail addresses.

Only four were supportive of the project.

The rest expressed fear, resentment, and opposition. Many bluntly. Some laced with profanity.

Turns out, many Americans aren't too thrilled about having their private information complied in a massive public database.

Photo by John Sommers II/Getty Images.

"When you call the bank, do they ask for your full social or just the last 4?" one voter wrote, expressing concern over the form asking for part of his SSID number. "So if someone wanted access to my bank account information, the address, full name, DOB and last four social is EXACTLY what they would need."

Some took issue with the sketchy policy record of the comission's leaders.

"This commission is a sham and Kris Kobach has been put on it expressly to disenfranchise minority voters," a California voter replied. "I am ashamed that my taxpayer dollars are being used for such purposes.

Others argued that the commission should investigate Russian interference instead.

"What you should be addressing is the ability of foreign nationals to hack into our election servers and not only try to change the registrations but possibly change the actual vote," another wrote. "You should be worried about how each state secures the votes and the voter registrations."

One voter, who identified himself as a priest, blasted the effort as a vanity project for the president.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

"I have watched your activities in Kansas trying to suppress voters on the basis of fraudulent claims of massive voter fraud for which there is absolutely no evidence," he wrote. "Our new agency is preparing, it seems, to rig elections. You, sir, are the fraud and neither you nor our President are to be trusted. Mr. Trump's claims that millions of fraudulent votes were cast against him is the ravings of an egomaniac who can't stand to lose. I hope and pray that you fail."

Many were simply curt — and blunt.

"Does the term 'secret ballot' mean anything to you?" one wondered.

Dozens more voters wrote in.

Most were ... less civil.

Multiple studies have cast major doubt on the existence of widespread voter fraud.

Photo by Ron Jenkins/Getty Images.

A review of 1 billion votes cast between 2000 and 2014 found only 31 verifiable cases of voter impersonation.

Meanwhile, an Civis Analytics analysis commissioned by Democratic Super PAC Priorities USA found Wisconsin's voter ID law may have reduced turnout by approximately 200,000 voters "disproportionally" hailing from communities of color.

Many Americans, it seems, have had enough of being misled.

Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images.

As of July 5, 44 states and Washington, D.C., have refused to turn over at least some voter information to the commission. More could do the same in the coming weeks.

"Your nonsense worked when it was in the dark," one voter wrote to the commission, "But you won't get away with this."

If the vast majority of those who wrote Kobach and Pence's team get their way, they won't indeed.

Former President George W. Bush and current president Donald Trump may both be Republicans but they have contrasting views when it comes to immigration.

Trump has been one of the most anti-immigrant presidents of recent memory. His Administration separated undocumented families at the border, placed bans on travelers from majority-Muslim countries, and he's proudly proclaimed, "Our country is full."

George W. Bush's legacy on immigration is a bit more nuanced. He ended catch-and-release and called for heightened security at the U.S.-Mexico border, but he also championed an immigration bill that created a guest worker program and a pathway to citizenship for undocumented people.

Unfortunately, that bill did not pass.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Picsea on Unsplash
True

It is said that once you've seen something, you can't unsee it. This is exactly what is happening in America right now. We have collectively watched the pot of racial tension boil over after years of looking the other way, insisting that hot water doesn't exist, pretending not to notice the smoke billowing out from every direction.

Ignoring a problem doesn't make it go away—it prolongs resolution. There's a whole lot of harm to be remedied and damage to be repaired as a result of racial injustice, and it's up to all of us to figure out how to do that. Parents, in particular, are recognizing the importance of raising anti-racist children; if we are unable to completely eradicate racism, maybe the next generation will.

How can parents ensure that the next generation will actively refuse to perpetuate systems and behaviors embedded in racism? The most obvious answer is to model it. Take for example, professional tennis player Serena Williams and her husband, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian.

Keep Reading Show less

I saw this poster today and I was going to just let it go, but then I kept feeling tugged to say something.

Melanie Cholish/Facebook

While this poster is great to bring attention to the issue of child trafficking, it is a "shocking" picture of a young girl tied up. It has that dark gritty feeling. I picture her in a basement tied to a dripping pipe.

While that sounds awful, it's important to know that trafficking children in the US is not all of that. I can't say it never is—I don't know. What I do know is most young trafficked children aren't sitting in a basement tied up. They have families, and someone—usually in their family—is trafficking them.

Keep Reading Show less

Roland Pollard and his 4-year-old daughter Jayden have been doing cheer and tumbling stunts together since Jayden could walk. When you see videos of their skills, the level of commitment is apparent—as is the supportive relationship this daddy has with his daughter.

Pollard, a former competitive cheerleader and cheer coach, told In The Know that he didn't expect Jayden to catch on to her flying skills at age 3, but she did. He said he never pressures her to perform stunts and that she enjoys it. And as a viral video of Jayden almost falling during a stunt shows, excelling at a skill requires good teaching—something Pollard appears to have mastered.

Keep Reading Show less