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True fact: The first sluts were men. And 4 other surprising things about sluts.

So, when someone points out that my house is a total mess, I should interpret that as slut-shaming?

True fact: The first sluts were men. And 4 other surprising things about sluts.

There's lots of talk about sluts, slut-shaming, sluttiness, and other slut-related topics these days.

But did you ever stop and think, "What even is this word?" Like, what does it really mean? Where did it come from? What's so bad about it? In this Stuff Mom Never Told You, Cristen Conger gives us five points that will forever change how you hear that word.


1. The first sluts were men.

The very first man-sluts didn't sleep around. They just were sloppy dressers.

2. "Slut" became a word for a woman fairly quickly.

By the 15th century, a slut was a woman who didn't do a great job keeping her house clean.

3. Slut has almost always had racist and classist undertones.

Slut has long implied low class. Poor women were thought to do a bad job keeping their homes clean. But for a long time, only white women were called sluts.

Because of the way our racist society sexualizes black women, they were sort of assumed to be slutty to begin with. No need to say it.

4. During times when women have stood up for themselves, the word "slut" gets used a ton.

Usage of "slut" spiked in the 1920s (right after women got the right to vote) and the 1980s (when more women joined the work force than ever before).

5. In the present, "slut" is used largely by girls to slut-shame other girls.

That's right. It's used more by girls than guys. And that's not OK.

Every time you use that word to tear someone down, you're bringing back a history of racism, classism, and sexism.

This fantastic video has even more information about historical sluts. I highly recommend it (along with the rest of Cristen's work; she's amazing).

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


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Then, last summer, we found ourselves in an unexpected scenario. I was working as a freelance writer with regular contract work and my husband left his job to manage our short-term rentals and do part-time contracting work. We both had incomes, but for the first time, no employer-provided insurance. His previous employer offered COBRA coverage, of course, but it was crazy expensive. It made far more sense to go straight to the ACA Marketplace, since that's what we'd have done once COBRA ran out anyway.

The process of getting our ACA healthcare plan set up was a nightmare, but I'm so very thankful for it.

Let me start by saying I live in a state that is friendly to the ACA and that adopted and implemented the Medicaid expansion. I am also a college-educated and a native English speaker with plenty of adult paperwork experience. But the process of getting set up on my state's marketplace was the most confusing, frustrating experience I've ever had signing up for anything, ever.

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


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via Lorie Shaull / Flickr

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