They Agreed To Die Early If They Could Have 'The Perfect Body.' Yep, Die.

There are plenty of reasons why diets suck and plenty more reasons why no one should want to risk their life to be a certain weight.

Meet Laci.

She was 17 years old when she went on a diet.


"I said no cheese, no bread, no ice cream, basically all my favorite unhealthy things were off limits. I did it because I wanted to lose weight in time for summer. ... I would weigh myself every day, obsess over love handles and thigh gaps and arm flaps. I remember this one time I went to my friend's house, and they wanted to order pizza, and I was like, 'Yes! No!' And I ate it, and I felt terrible the next couple of days."

It sucks that Laci is not alone in her thinking. This is an all too common story. In fact, 1 in 3 female students who were polled in a big 'ole survey in the U.K. admitted to being OK with cutting months or years off of their lives to have "the perfect body."

I repeat — they were willing to DIE.

Thankfully, Laci realized that her obsessive diet was not a good idea.

"The perfect body that so many people are chasing after is like 20% below the ideal healthy weight. ... Dieting for me was really a solution to the problem of feeling terrible about myself, and I didn't know there were any alternatives to deal with it. But there are."

Ready for Laci's awesome alternatives?! I know I am.

Tip #1: "If you're dieting to be skinnier, maybe just stop."

Restricting the types of food you eat can lower your metabolism and can also make you feel weak, which can make you more susceptible to getting sick. That's probably why, as Laci says, "95% of diets just straight don't work. People gain all the weight back."

Tip #2: Realize that you are not the problem.

The mainstream media often sets the standard for what's seen as beautiful and valuable. (This also includes a $60 billion-a-year diet industry that thrives on making folks feel bad about their bodies.) Sexism also plays a role in making women feel insecure, Laci notes: "Women are socialized to constantly monitor their own bodies and to make sure that they don't take up too much space." Let's not forget about influences from our social circle. Love them or not, they're part of the problem too because, in Laci's words, "our friends and our parents diet, and body image issues seep into our brain."

Tip #3: Give yourself some love.

When was the last time you looked in the mirror and got really excited about what was staring back at you? Laci's advice is great: "I'm talking about giving yourself the love that you deserve. I'm talking about not shit-talking yourself and comparing yourself to other people. I'm talking about choices that are actually healthy, not letting the world stop with some pizza or bikinis."

Tip #4: Realize that you're a full person, not a walking scale.

Want to crush the diet industry? It could happen if everyone realized one simple truth: You are good enough. Laci's key point is that "people's goodness, their value, does not come down to their weight. You are a whole-ass human being that is so much more than just a number."

To learn more, check out the video:

<span class="redactor-invisible-space"></span>

Of course, when talking about anything health related, it's always good to get a doctor's opinion.

If you agree with the points in this video, pass it on! Sharing positive info like this can help a lot of women.

More
Courtesy of Houseplant.

In America, one dumb mistake can hang over your head forever.

Nearly 30% of the American adult population — about 70 million people — have at least one criminal conviction that can prevent them from being treated equally when it comes to everything from job and housing opportunities to child custody.

Twenty million of these Americans have felony convictions that can destroy their chances of making a comfortable living and prevents them from voting out the lawmakers who imprisoned them.

Many of these convictions are drug-related and stem from the War on Drugs that began in the U.S. '80s. This war has unfairly targeted the minority community, especially African-Americans.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

Climate change is happening because the earth is warming at an accelerated rate, a significant portion of that acceleration is due to human activity, and not taking measures to mitigate it will have disastrous consequences for life as we know it.

In other words: Earth is heating up, it's kinda our fault, and if we don't fix it, we're screwed.

This is the consensus of the vast majority of the world's scientists who study such things for a living. Case closed. End of story.

How do we know this to be true? Because pretty much every reputable scientific organization on the planet has examined and endorsed these conclusions. Thousands of climate studies have been done, and multiple peer-reviewed studies have been done on those studies, showing that somewhere between 84 and 97 percent of active climate science experts support these conclusions. In fact, the majority of those studies put the consensus well above 90%.

Keep Reading Show less
Nature
via James Anderson

Two years ago, a tweet featuring the invoice for a fixed boiler went viral because the customer, a 91-year-old woman with leukemia, received the services for free.

"No charge for this lady under any circumstances," the invoice read. "We will be available 24 hours to help her and keep her as comfortable as possible."

The repair was done by James Anderson, 52, a father-of-five from Burnley, England. "James is an absolute star, it was overwhelming to see that it cost nothing," the woman's daughter told CNN.

Keep Reading Show less
Heroes

I live in a family with various food intolerances. Thankfully, none of them are super serious, but we are familiar with the challenges of finding alternatives to certain foods, constantly checking labels, and asking restaurants about their ingredients.

In our family, if someone accidentally eats something they shouldn't, it's mainly a bit of inconvenient discomfort. For those with truly life-threatening food allergies, the stakes are much higher.

I can't imagine the ongoing stress of deadly allergy, especially for parents trying to keep their little ones safe.

Keep Reading Show less
popular