The sweet reason a Walmart manager found this worker shoeless, wearing pink socks.

There's good customer service, and then there's what Phil did last week for a person in need.

Customer Myrna Kines was shopping at a Walmart in Lithia Springs, Georgia, when she spotted Phil (last name omitted by request) giving his pink sneakers to a homeless man.

There was no catch. There was no ulterior motive. It was a simple, selfless act of generosity.


Kines was so in awe that she asked to snap a photo of Phil because he "needed to be commended." That pic has since gone viral after getting shared by the Facebook page Love What Matters.

"I just witnessed this young man take the shoes off of his feet and give them to a man that needed them at Walmart on...

Posted by Love What Matters on Sunday, July 31, 2016

“That touched my heart very strongly,” Kines told 11 Alive News in Atlanta, noting that Phil's matching pink sneakers and socks were the same color for a very significant reason: Phil's grandma died of breast cancer, he'd told Kines, so he wears pink in honor of her memory.

As Kines promised in her Facebook post, she called the store to tell them what an "awesome employee" they have on their hands.

When store manager Mike Kastensmidt got the message, he went to find Phil to thank him. He found his employee standing there in his socks.

"I got the warm and fuzzy tingles," Kastensmidt told Upworthy.

When asked about the incident, Phil explained to Kastensmidt that he too knows what it's like to hit rock bottom — Phil himself had been homeless as a teenager. Inspired by his employee's selflessness, Kastensmidt told Phil he could pick out any pair he'd like from the shoe department, and Kastensmidt would foot the bill.

Phil returned with a pair of shoes — not embellished sneakers or trendy new boots, but basic $13 slippers.

Photo via iStock.

As for Kines, she says it's worth noting whenever you come across generous people like Phil.

After all, the Phils of the world don't always get the positive attention and praise they deserve. They're generous and selfless because it's the right thing to do, not because they want attention.

We live in a world full of negativity," Kines told 11 Alive. “So when you see a person do what this guy did, it deserves recognition."

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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via Gage Skidmore/Flickr and Terry Morgan/Flickr

Senator Ted Cruz and a kangaroo.

Conservative media in the United States has painted Australia as a state on the brink of authoritarianism due to strict COVID-19 protections in some parts of the country. These news outlets appear to be using the country as an example of what can happen in America if liberal politicians go unchecked.

Fox News' Tucker Carlson ran a story on Australia earlier this month claiming the country "looks a lot like China did at the beginning of the pandemic." He ended it by saying that "what's happening in Australia might be instructive to us in the United States" and that things can "change very quickly" and become "dystopian and autocratic."

Carlson provides zero reasons why Americans should be fearful of becoming an autocratic country due to COVID-19, beyond the idea that "things can change very quickly" so his appeals sound a lot more like fear-mongering than genuine concern.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."