The 'Star Wars' Facebook page replied obviously and correctly to a sexist comment.

Meet Captain Phasma. She's a character in the new "Star Wars" movie.

And that's ... basically all we know about her.

Most details about her remain top secret, so much so that "Star Wars" HQ has only revealed two pretty obvious things: She's a high-ranking stormtrooper, and she's played by Gwendoline Christie, aka Brienne of Tarth from "Game of Thrones."


I think she's ready. Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images.

Despite knowing next to nothing about who she is, what she does, or what role she plays in the story, some fans have very ... strong opinions about the way she looks.

Specifically about her armor.


Shiny and chrome. Photo via Mike DeLeon/Twitter.

Which, historically speaking, on female characters, has tended to look more like ... this.

Yeah, maybe it protects your chest, neck, and face, but how much gam does it show? Photo by JD Hancock/Flickr.

Or even, somehow, this.

"Can you go in the hot tub with your armor on? Let's focus on what's really important here, people." Photo via Pixabay.

For reference, this is real armor.

The better to protect your torso from blows from the GIANT SWORDS you're sparring with. Photo by Lowell Silverman/Wikimedia Commons.

Unsurprisingly, actual experts (yes, really) have convincingly argued that were you to wear the kind of armor typically drawn onto female action heroes to a real sword/axe/gun/laser fight, you would be very quickly dead.

Thankfully, "Star Wars" was having none of it. None. At. All.

Here's how they replied to one whiny commenter, and, in 11 words, completely ended the ridiculous debate.


Let's blow that up, for those of you in the cheap seats.

Screenshot via Man vs. Pink/Twitter, artwork by Seth Groves/Instagram.

Ordinarily I would try to say something clever here, but no "May the Force be with you" quip does the awesomeness of this comeback justice. It's perfect.

Female warriors wouldn't wear special, form-fitting costumes that only exist to be ogled. They would wear what would best help them win in a fight.

Thank you, Official "Star Wars" Facebook Page, for reminding us all what's important about armor.

It doesn't matter how good it looks at a pool party. Man or woman, it just needs to keep you the hell alive.

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