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Every year, Doritos has a commercial contest to see which creative citizen can make the best Super Bowl ad for them. This year, they got a lot of entries. This was not one of them. Some folks decided that they wanted to help Doritos be a little bit more responsible. And so this hilarious thing happened.

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So why should you care?


From Sum of Us:

Rainforests across Southeast Asia are being destroyed every day to make way for massive palm oil plantations, where workers, even children, are trapped in modern slavery to cultivate the vegetable oil. The clearing of these rainforests and peatlands are driving many species like the orangutan and Sumatran tiger to the brink of extinction, while also polluting the Earth's atmosphere by releasing gigatons of greenhouse gases.


Each year, PepsiCo buys 427,500 tonnes of palm oil.

When we were fact-checking this, we found that PepsiCo, which owns Doritos, has been making small steps in the right direction. But they aren't anything to write home about. They promised to use only sustainable palm oil as of 2015.

And they did! Sort of. Well, actually, just for an Australian distributor.

We need your help to encourage them to actually do what they promised. Because apparently suggesting that you avoid merchants who enslave people is hard.

So sign this petition, and let's see if we can get them to think more broadly about the bigger picture and about being a force for more good in the world.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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This article originally appeared on 09.08.16


92-year-old Norma had a strange and heartbreaking routine.

Every night around 5:30 p.m., she stood up and told the staff at her Ohio nursing home that she needed to leave. When they asked why, she said she needed to go home to take care of her mother. Her mom, of course, had long since passed away.

Behavior like Norma's is quite common for older folks suffering from Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia. Walter, another man in the same assisted living facility, demanded breakfast from the staff every night around 7:30.

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