It was a silent disaster in the night.

30 years ago, a gas leak from a Union Carbide-owned agricultural chemical plant caused a massive cloud of poison to envelope a sleeping city. Over half a million people in Bhopal, India, were exposed to toxic gas. 8,000 people died immediately or in the following weeks. 100,000 suffer chronic and incurable diseases today.


People in Bhopal and elsewhere continue to request that Dow Chemical (the company that now owns Union Carbide) provide support for people still suffering — victims received very little compensation — and clean up the chemical plant. The derelict plant sits unremedied, polluting drinking water.

After 20 years, the Yes Men shook things up.

10 years ago, on the 20th anniversary of the world's largest agricultural industry disaster, a member of the activist group the Yes Men posed as a Dow Chemical representative and issued a statement that Dow had agreed to compensate those harmed in the accident. The BBC fell for it. Watch what happened:

The BBC gave Bichlbaum a hard time about misleading people. What do you think?

There is some good news: People in the U.S. have divested from Dow, and the Indian government has agreed to provide financial support for some victims.

This isn't just a one-time incident. Here are six others:

  • Fertilizer plant explosion in West, Texas, April 17, 2013. An explosion occurred at the West Fertilizer Company storage and distribution facility in West, Texas, 18 miles (29 km) north of Waco while emergency services personnel were responding to a fire at the facility. At least 14 people were killed, more than 160 were injured, and more than 150 buildings were damaged or destroyed.
  • AZF fertilizer factory, Toulouse, France. Sept. 21, 2001. An explosion at the factory killed 29 and injured 2,500.
  • The Sandoz disaster in Schweizerhalle, Switzerland, Nov. 1, 1986, released tons of toxic agrochemicals into the Rhine River.
  • Dec. 3, 1984: The Bhopal disaster in India caused by poisonous methyl isocyanate caused the pressure relief system to vent large amounts to the atmosphere at a Union Carbide India Limited plant. Death toll estimates range from 4,000 to 20,000, with severe human and animal health problems continuing up to the present day.
  • The Minamata disaster, Japan, 1932-1968, was caused by the dumping of mercury compounds in Minamata Bay, Japan. The Chisso Corporation, a fertilizer and later petrochemical company, was found responsible for polluting the bay for 37 years. It is estimated that over 3,000 people suffered various deformities, severe mercury poisoning symptoms, or death.
  • Texas City, April 16, 1947. 2,300 tons of ammonium nitrate, used in fertilizer and blasting, detonated, creating a chain reaction of fires and explosions killing at least 581 people, including all but one member of the Texas City fire department.
  • Oppau, Germany, Sept. 21, 1921. A tower silo storing 4,500 tonnes of a mixture of ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate fertilizer exploded at a BASF plant in Oppau, killing 500-600 people and injuring about 2,000 more.
  • Our fertilizers and pesticides are dangerous, toxic chemicals. Isn't it a twisted paradox that so many people die in order to create chemicals we use to grow food so people can live?

    Bonus track: The Yes Men's latest:

Courtesy of CeraVe
True

Have you ever wondered what drives nurses to do what they do? We took a walk in one nurse’s shoes to get a better understanding of what makes her truly remarkable.

Emily Danz of Fort Lee, New Jersey, grew up watching her Yiayia (“grandmother” in Greek), battle heart disease. As a child, she listened with curiosity and amazement as the doctors explained cardiac procedures and outcomes to her family.

Keep Reading Show less
via Pexels

The Emperor of the Seas.

Imagine retiring early and spending the rest of your life on a cruise ship visiting exotic locations, meeting interesting people and eating delectable food. It sounds fantastic, but surely it’s a billionaire’s fantasy, right?

Not according to Angelyn Burk, 53, and her husband Richard. They’re living their best life hopping from ship to ship for around $44 a night each. The Burks have called cruise ships their home since May 2021 and have no plans to go back to their lives as landlubbers. Angelyn took her first cruise in 1992 and it changed her goals in life forever.

“Our original plan was to stay in different countries for a month at a time and eventually retire to cruise ships as we got older,” Angelyn told 7 News. But a few years back, Angelyn crunched the numbers and realized they could start much sooner than expected.

Keep Reading Show less
True

It takes a special type of person to become a nurse. The job requires a combination of energy, empathy, clear mind, oftentimes a strong stomach, and a cheerful attitude. And while people typically think of nursing in a clinical setting, some nurses are driven to work with the people that feel forgotten by society.

Keep Reading Show less

Rick Riordan at a book signing in 2007.

When my son got into the "Percy Jackson" books in the sixth grade, I hadn’t really heard of the series but I learned it's much like the "Harry Potter" for Gen Zers. Enormously thick books were devoured in under a week and alarms were set for the next release in the series. Searches were on for the super-secret hidden book that wraps up a few loose ends and a fandom was born. But when the books were made into a live action movie, true fans of the series were left confused and disappointed, so when it was discovered that "Percy Jackson" was getting a reboot, fans rejoiced. Then the cast was announced, which should have been a moment of celebration for the fantastic actors chosen and the effort to bring representation to Greek mythology, but some fans were less than thrilled.

Leah Jeffries, a Black girl, and Aryan Simhadri, an Indian American boy, were cast to play Annabeth Chase and Grover Underwood, Percy’s best friends. The trio go on adventures and help each other out of sketchy predicaments that can only be experienced by demigods and satyrs. But… it didn’t take long for naysayers to start piping up over fictional characters being represented by people of color, particularly Annabeth being played by a Black girl, when the character in the series has blond hair. Eventually, the growing discontent caught the attention of none other than Rick Riordan himself and he not only took to Twitter to defend the young star, but wrote a beautiful strong condemnation of these comments in a letter on his website.

Keep Reading Show less

Make it a night to remember, they said.

Ah, prom. A quintessential teen experience that somehow manages to take every single one of those high octane, conflicting emotions felt during the entire school year and condense them into one solitary evening. All while everyone is dressed in elegant evening wear.

Though prom began as early as the 1800s as a simple cotillion, it has evolved over the years to become more extravagant—what with “promposals” and limousines and celebrity appearances. But, it has also evolved to become more LGBTQ inclusive and challenging of old gender rules.

Prom is (and continues to be) such an integral part of teen culture that it’s the central plot of many well loved rites-of-passage movies like “Pretty in Pink,” “She’s All That,” and “The Perks of Being a Wallflower.” Hopefully, your own prom was more like these movies, and less like “Carrie.”

jimmy fallon prom fails Giphy

But the truth is: for many of us, prom really was somewhere between a romantic comedy and a horror movie. For every romantic slow dance and first kiss there were also plenty of fashion disasters, alcohol experiments gone wrong and relationship drama. Lots and lots of relationship drama. Successes and failures, if you will.

In honor of prom season, Jimmy Fallon asked his “Tonight Show” audience to share some of their most memorable prom fails on Twitter. Here are 20 that were just too hilarious and/or relatable not to share. Hopefully it will help you love your own #PromFail.


Keep Reading Show less