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Teens continue on with sweet breakfast tradition for a grandmother who lost her grandson

After Sam's tragic passing, the "breakfast club" was determined to keep his memory alive.

kindness, breakfast club, breakfast, good news
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There's a reason why they call it comfort food

One day, a teen boy named Sam Crowe told his grandma Peggy Winckowski that he had been bragging about her cooking to his friends, saying “my grandma makes the best breakfast.”

“Grandma Peggy,” as she’s universally known, invited the group over to try one of her legendary breakfasts, and the following week she was greeted by Sam, his cousin Owen and seven of their school friends—all of whom enjoyed an extraordinary meal, along with a round of hugs.

One morning meetup led to another, and thus their makeshift breakfast club was born. Every Wednesday morning, Grandma Peggy would prepare a lavish meal for a larger and larger group. This tradition lasted throughout the year.

Then, tragedy struck.

In July 2022, Sam was killed in a moped accident, leaving Grandma Peggy devastated. But not alone, because she was still greeted by Sam’s classmates for their breakfast club meetups every single day following the week of the accident, then every Wednesday for the rest of the school year. The breakfast club had not come to a close. In fact, it has grown larger than ever before.

The club would also meet for special holidays, game days and to celebrate Peggy’s birthday.

Grandma Peggy truly had become everyone’s grandma. As one of her regulars told CBS Sunday Morning, “She’s just a built-in grandmother to all of us.”

“Grandma Peggy just brings everyone together. She cares for us a lot. She really cares for us,” another added.

Through compassion, community and delicious comfort food, Grandma Peggy and Sam’s friends have been able to heal together while honoring a tradition he started.

Watch the full story from CBS Sunday Mornings below:

The breakfast club

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