Screenshot via Puzzle Warehouse

I see so many people complain about how "everything is racist these days" and "people just blame white supremacy for everything."

Yeah. You know why? Because racism and white supremacy actually are infused and embedded into almost everything in our country. We're just finally starting to acknowledge it.

And by "we," I mean white folks.

(To be clear, when I talk about white supremacy, I'm not just talking about the extremist/Neo-Nazi/KKK hate groups. I'm referring to the notion, conscious or unconscious, that white people are preferable, better, more deserving, or otherwise superior to non-white people—a notion that was widely accepted among white people throughout American history.)

The vast majority of people of color in America already know this to be true and have always known it to be true. White Americans, by and large, have been ignorant, oblivious, or in denial about how America's legacy of white supremacy impacts us.

There's a reason for this:

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Culture

Nebraska state senator John McCollister took to Twitter over the weekend, calling out the Republican party's enabling of white supremacy and tolerance of racism. The kicker? He himself is a lifelong Republican.

Senater McCollister wrote in a series of tweets:

"The Republican Party is enabling white supremacy in our country. As a lifelong Republican, it pains me to say this, but it's the truth."

Daaaaang. He just went and dropped the bomb right out of the gate. Even with the "not all Republicans" caveat, he still spoke his truth.

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Democracy

Emmet Till was a fun-loving 14-year-old, always joking and pulling silly pranks. In 1955, while visiting with family in Mississippi, he allegedly flirted with a white woman in a grocery store. Four days later, the woman's husband and half brother broke into Till's uncle's house, kidnapped the boy at gunpoint, beat him severely, gouged out one of his eyes, and then shot him in the head. Using barbed wire, they tied a large metal fan to his neck and threw him into the Tallahatchie River.

When Till's body was found three days later, his face was unrecognizable and a monogrammed ring he wore had to be used to identify him.

The two men who kidnapped him were arrested, and three weeks later they stood trial. After less than an hour's deliberation, the all-white, all-male jury acquitted the men of all charges. After brutally murdering an innocent child, they walked free.

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Culture

After the Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles were uninvited from their scheduled visit to the White House in early June 2018, star safety Malcolm Jenkins decided to try something different when asked by the media about player protests.

He greeted them with silence — instead answering questions with a series of signs.

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