Canada designates the Proud Boys a terrorist group, right alongside al-Qaeda and ISIS

For the past few years, we've watched the Proud Boys show up at rallies and protests to declare—sometimes violently—the supremacy of Western civilization, their pride in having a penis, and a glaringly apparent inferiority complex.

Today the Canadian government officially declared the Proud Boys a "terrorist entity," adding the group to a list that includes notorious terrorist groups such as ISIS and al-Qaeda. The move comes after the Canadian Parliament unanimously passed a motion last month for the federal government to make the designation.

The Proud Boys is a men's club whose members identify themselves as "Western Chauvinists." The group was formed in 2016 by Canadian Gavin McInnes, who has since cut ties with the group (apparently to help some members who were facing assault and riot charges in 2018). According to the AP, McInnes has claimed that the group is not a far-right extremist group that espouses racist ideology, however, he has acknowledged that there is overlap between the Proud Boys and white nationalist groups.


The group was reportedly part of the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on January 6—a detail noted by government officials. Though the Capitol attack was not the "driving" factor for the designation, they said that it did put a lot of information into the public domain, which went into the intelligence reports.

"Their intent and their escalation toward violence became quite clear," Canadian Public Safety Minister Bill Blair said in a briefing.

Blair said that they've seen this escalation toward violence since 2018, and that group members espouse misogynistic, Islamophobic, anti-Semitic, anti-immigrant, and white supremacist ideologies.

"The group and its members have openly encouraged, planned, and conducted violent activities against those they perceive to be opposed to their ideology and political beliefs," the Canadian government explained in briefing materials, adding that the group "regularly attends Black Lives Matter (BLM) protests as counter-protesters, often engaging in violence targeting BLM supporters. On January 6, 2021, the Proud Boys played a pivotal role in the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol."

According to the Washington Post, a terrorist designation means the police can seize group or group members' property and banks can seize their assets. People can be prosecuted for giving the group money or paraphernalia, and group members can be denied entry to Canada.

Canada is the first country to designate the Proud Boys a terrorist group. However, some anti-hate and civil liberties groups in Canada have been unsure about the wisdom of such a designation.

The Canadian Anti-Hate Network wrote on Twitter, "We have previously expressed concern that the definition of a terrorist entity would have to change, or the bar be lowered, to list the Proud Boys—on the basis that a loosened definition could be exploited to target BIPOC or anti-racist groups in the future." However, they added, Minister Blair had contacted them to address the concern, telling them that based on the information the government has, the Proud Boys "more than meet the criteria to be designated a terrorist entity."

When asked in today's press briefing whether the U.S. would consider a similar declaration, White House press secretary Jen Psaki responded, "We, of course, have a review underway—a domestic violence extremism review...I expect we will wait for that review to conclude before making any determinations."

While it's understandable that investigations have to happen as they did in Canada, this designation is merely acknowledging what we've all seen with our own eyes. We've already had the FBI warn us that white supremacists are our biggest domestic terror threat and Congress has also acknowledged that "white supremacists and other far-right-wing extremists are the most significant domestic terrorism threat facing the United States." In addition, on January 30, prosecutors announced conspiracy charges against the Proud Boys for their role in the Capitol riot.

It's not a stretch to see that the Proud Boys, who engage in political violence and who closely fraternize with white supremacists even if they deny espousing those views as a group, pose a clear and present threat to the safety and security of our nation.

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Macy's and Girls Inc. believe that all girls deserve to be safe, supported, and valued. However, racial disparities continue to exist for young people when it comes to education levels, employment, and opportunities for growth. Add to that the gender divide, and it's clear to see why it's important for girls of color to have access to mentors who can equip them with the tools needed to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers.

Anissa Rivera is one of those mentors. Rivera is a recent Program Manager at the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc., a nonprofit focusing on the holistic development of girls ages 5-18. The goal of the organization is to provide a safe space for girls to develop long-lasting mentoring relationships and build the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to thrive now and as adults.

Rivera spent years of her career working within the themes of self and community empowerment with young people — encouraging them to tap into their full potential. Her passion for youth development and female empowerment eventually led her to Girls Inc., where she served as an agent of positive change helping to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

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Inspiring young women from all backgrounds is why Macy's has continued to partner with Girls Inc. for the second year in a row. The partnership will support mentoring programming that offers girls career readiness, college preparation, financial literacy, and more. Last year, Macy's raised over $1.3M for Girls Inc. in support of this program along with their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programming for more than 26,000 girls. Studies show that girls who participated are more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, score higher on standardized math tests, and be more equipped for college and campus life.

Thanks to mentors like Rivera, girls across the country have the tools they need to excel in school and the confidence to change the world. With your help, we can give even more girls the opportunity to rise up. Throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases or donate online to support Girls Inc. at Macys.com/MacysGives.

Who runs the world? Girls!

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Over the past six years, it feels like race relations have been on the decline in the U.S. We've lived through Donald Trump's appeals to America's racist underbelly. The nation has endured countless murders of unarmed Black people by police. We've also been bombarded with viral videos of people calling the police on people of color for simply going about their daily lives.

Earlier this year there was a series of incidents in which Asian-Americans were the targets of racist attacks inspired by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Given all that we've seen in the past half-decade, it makes sense for many to believe that race relations in the U.S. are on the decline.

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Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

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Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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