At times, media coverage of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's relationship has been unfair, mean, and even downright racist. The couple has hinted that inflammatory media coverage is part of the reason why they're stepping down as senior royals. But just because they're removing themselves from the family doesn't mean the pounding in the press is going away anytime soon. Prince Harry just called out the Times of London for publishing a "potentially harmful" story about "Megxit." This is why we can't have nice things.

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Prince Harry's royal tour of Africa must be eye-opening. The royal recently wrote an essay published in The Telegraph stressing the importance of conservation, calling out the problem for what it is. "I have no problem in admitting that we are all part of the problem in some way, but a lot of us simply aren't aware of the damage that is being caused," wrote the Duke of Sussex.

Prince Harry details the consequences of neglecting and ravaging the environment. "Rivers and deltas have been overfished in an unsustainable manner - mainly to sell to neighbouring countries who have out-fished their own stocks. This only benefits the few who are selling them and leaves the communities that depend on them with nothing," Prince Harry wrote. West Africa loses an estimated $1.3 billion to illegal fishing each year. Senegal alone loses $300 million to the practice, which accounts for 2% of the country's GDP.

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Gender-based violence in South Africa is not just a problem, it's a "national crisis," according to South Africa's president, Cyril Ramaphosa. Official figures state 137 sexual offences are committed each day, and more than 30 women were killed by their spouses last month. Between April 2018 and March 2019, an alarming 66,992 sexual offenses were reported.

The country is working to combat the problem, and this week, girls received support in the form of an inspirational speech from Meghan Markle. During a royal tour of South Africa, the Duchess and Prince Harry visited Cape Town's Nyanga township to speak out against gender-based violence. Nyanga is known as South Africa's "murder capital," with 289 murders reported in the area last year alone.

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While in South Africa, the royal couple visited Justice Desk, a human rights group that helps girls who've been the victims of rape and abuse. There, Meghan and Harry danced with children, heard personal stories from women affected by gender-based violence in the region, and watched girls take a self-defense class.

Meghan spoke to a crowd of 250 people, bringing them a message of hope. "We are encouraged to hear your president take the next step towards preventing gender-based violence through education and necessary changes to reinforce the values of modern South Africa. I have to say, I feel incredibly humble to be in the presence of all of you as you stand firm in your core values of respect, dignity, and equality," the Duchess said.


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If anyone grasps the importance of mental health, it's the royal family.

Princes Harry and William, as well as Kate Middleton, the Duchess of Cambridge, have made it their mission to bring the critical issue to the public's attention.

In 2016, they teamed up with mental health charity Heads Together and released a public service announcement about why it's so important to discuss mental health. Since then, they've made a number of public appearances in support of the cause. Harry opened up about his own mental health struggles, and the brothers filmed themselves talking about what it was like losing their mother at such a young age. They even got together with Lady Gaga to help raise awareness.

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