Queen Elizabeth condemned anti-gay discrimination, but she left one big thing out.

The last time Queen Elizabeth II mentioned LGBTQ rights in a Queen's Speech was 2003.

On June 21, 2017, the monarch gave the community a long overdue shoutout.

Photo by Arthur Edwards/Getty Images.


"My ministers will seek to enhance rights and protections in the modern workplace," the queen read from a document prepared by ministers of Prime Minister Theresa May's conservative government. "My government will make further progress to tackle the gender pay gap and discrimination against people on the basis of their race, faith, gender, disability or sexual orientation."

The commitment to end sexual orientation-based workplace harassment was the first explicit call for LGBTQ equality in the address since the queen announced the government's support for civil union protections over a decade ago.  

The speech is delivered annually at the opening of Parliament.

Many cheered the queen for standing up for Britain's LGBTQ citizens.

Critics, however, noticed that the speech failed acknowledge the "T" in LGBTQ.

"We are very concerned no mention was made of tackling discrimination based on gender identity," a spokesperson for British LGBTQ rights organization Stonewall said in a statement to PinkNews.

Prime Minister Theresa May's government has pledged to amend laws that require citizens to undergo intrusive "medical checks," before a legal gender change, but mention of legislation was nowhere in the speech prepared for the queen.

The 2010 Equality Act ban contains only limited protection for transgender workers, including banning employers from discriminating against employees who take leave for the purpose of gender reassignment.

While calling out anti-gay workplace discrimination is a good step, the U.K.'s trans citizens shouldn't have to wait forever to hear vital, validating words of recognition from their queen.

Photo by Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images

According to comedian Stephen Fry, upon assenting to the country's 2013 marriage equality legislation, the 91-year-old monarch said:

"Who’d have thought 62 years ago when I came to the throne, I’d be signing something like this? Isn’t it wonderful?'"

If British voters can hold the government  to its commitments, perhaps she'll be celebrating extending fuller equality to people of all genders sooner rather than later.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.