Instagram / Snoop Dogg / USWNT

Studies have shown that men who have daughters are more likely to support women's rights. CEOs with daughter are more aware of the problems women face in the workplace, and a 2011 study of Danish companies found they're more likely to close the gender wage gap.

One man whose daughter has played a role in his championing of women's rights? Snoop Dogg. The rapper posted a video on Instagram highlighting the inequality that the U.S. women's soccer team is currently facing, and he did it in the most endearingly Snoop Dogg way.

"Food for thought: Shout out to the USA women's soccer team for their fourth World Cup, but what I want to talk about is they only get $90,000 per player, but the men, if they win it they get $500,000 per player," he said in the video. "Sorry-ass [expletive] men from the US soccer team ain't ever won [expletive], ain't gonna ever win [expletive], can't even get out of the [expletive] first round."

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Karamo Brown wholeheartedly believes LGBTQ people should own their coming out stories and experiences.

That's why the "Queer Eye" star made the personal decision to avoid the phrase "coming out" altogether in his own life.

And his reasoning actually makes a whole lot of sense.

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Natasha Rossi believed she had the perfect life.

She had two awesome kids — two and a half-year-old identical twins — and the love and support of her boyfriend, Desi. Life, she thought, could only get better.

All photos via Upworthy/Walgreens.

Then, in January 2019, she was hit with some of the hardest news that anyone can hear.

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Idaho and Utah recently joined the party, meaning that parents in every state can legally breastfeed in public.

Over the years, stories of people who have been asked to leave restaurants or other public places because someone complained about the way they fed their babies have made headlines, prompting outcry from advocates and providing fodder for debate among the masses.

Prior to states passing laws, there was little recourse for parents in such incidents. In fact, breastfeeders could be cited and fined for public indecency if a law enforcement officer responded to a complaint in some situations.

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