"It takes me like a half an hour to shave my father because I have to be so careful," a middle-aged man declares.

The man, identified as New Jersey native Kristian Rex, presses the razor to his elderly, disabled father's face — a face he loves. With great care, he glides the blade across his father's chin, upper lip, and cheeks, taking pains to listen and follow instructions.

"He's really particular about his sideburns." he says, as his dad smiles.

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Keah Brown feels cute, and she's not afraid to show it.

But for the 25-year-old from upstate New York, it hasn't always been that way.

“It took me a while to get to that place to feel any sort of positive thing about my physical appearance," says Brown, who has cerebral palsy. "So now that I do, I’m like, hey, I might as well celebrate it.”

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The disability vote counts in 2016, but it wasn’t always that way.

What it was like to vote while disabled 50 years ago, compared to now.

With all the progress that's been made in America, the "Land of Opportunity," it’s hard to believe the right to vote wasn’t always a given for everyone — including the disabled.

But if we take a look back at American history, we can see that there was a time not too long ago when people with disabilities did not have a say in any election, let alone a presidential one.

It wasn’t because of someone’s personal beliefs against voting, or even religious beliefs. There were simply no laws in place for the disabled to make their voices heard, which caused a longstanding battle of discrimination and prejudice. In fact, people within the disabled community were (and still are) often denied the right to vote despite steps being taken to grant them that right.

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