The first razor designed to shave other people is great news for millions of caregivers
Gillette

Jim and Carol lived an active, exciting life together as husband and wife. But when Jim was struck by a car while cycling near his home, their life changed dramatically. Jim was left needing round-the-clock care, and Carol, a retired nurse, took on the role of caregiver.

Every day, Carol helps Jim through his physical therapy and personal grooming routines. "If we don't do what we do on a daily basis to help him move forward, he'll become more and more dependent," Carol says. "Some days the challenges are very difficult."

More than 40 million Americans are in Carol's shoes, providing unpaid caregiving to loved ones who are disabled, elderly, or otherwise in need of assistance. With baby boomers getting older and people living longer, many middle-aged people find themselves caring for aging parents or grandparents. Others may have a developmentally delayed adult child at home, or a family member who has become disabled due to an accident or illness. From cooking to cleaning to bathing, caregivers help others do everyday tasks they aren't able to do for themselves.

RELATED: These glimpses into the lives of caregivers prove they're real unsung heroes.

Hygiene and grooming are a big part of a caregiver's job, and anything that makes those tasks easier is a good thing. That's why Gillette's new TREO razor, specifically designed for shaving other people, caught our eye.


According to Gillette, 4000 razors have been designed for shaving yourself. But up until now, zero razors have been designed for people who are unable to do that.

Carol uses the TREO to shave Jim's face, and impressed by how convenient it is and how well it works. "As a nurse, I'm thinking, 'How can they improve this process,'" she says, "but I really think that they have."

A Different Life Together | Gillette TREO www.youtube.com

Gillette's TREO razor was inspired by real-world conversations with caregivers and their loved ones and was pilot-tested in 2017.

"Our team noticed a conversation happening on social media about the daily challenges faced when caring for a loved one, which includes shaving," said Peter Ries, R&D Group Head at Gillette. "At Gillette we believe everyone has the right to look and feel their best. With our TREO razor, we are able to make the task of shaving less daunting for caregivers by enabling them to provide their loved ones with the dignity of a fresh shave."

The design team at Gillette pulled apart the razor as we know it and rebuilt it from the bottom up. The TREO includes a unique blade with a safety comb and grooves that prevent clogging, an ergonomic handle for better control, and built-in special shave gel that eliminates the need for water so caregivers can shave their loved ones without having to transport them to a sink.

RELATED: Turns out almost everyone loved that 'controversial' Gillette ad about toxic masculinity.

The "best a man can get" company has recently made big waves with ads that include trans people and ˚ Now, with the TREO razor, they company has taken inclusiveness one step further. Time Magazine awarded the Gillette TREO 2018 Innovation of the Year in the accessibility category and Fast Company called TREO "A Masterpiece of Inclusive Design."

Well done, Gillette.

Anyone who has gone through the process of disentangling themselves from an addiction knows it's an ongoing, daily battle. It may get easier, and the payoffs may become more apparent, but it's still a decision someone makes each day to stay detached from their substance of choice.

Seeing someone who has a long record of sobriety—especially after a very public struggle—can be motivating and inspiring for others in different stages of their recovery journey. That's part of why actor Rob Lowe's announcement that he's reached 31 years sober is definitely something to celebrate.

"Today I have 31 years drug and alcohol free," Lowe wrote on Twitter. "I want to give thanks to everyone walking this path with me, and welcome anyone thinking about joining us; the free and the happy. And a big hug to my family for putting up with me!! Xoxo"

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The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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