Behold the first razor designed to shave someone else.

"It takes me like a half an hour to shave my father because I have to be so careful," a middle-aged man declares.

The man, identified as New Jersey native Kristian Rex, presses the razor to his elderly, disabled father's face — a face he loves. With great care, he glides the blade across his father's chin, upper lip, and cheeks, taking pains to listen and follow instructions.

"He's really particular about his sideburns." he says, as his dad smiles.


The ad, which recently won six Lion Awards at Cannes, is the centerpiece of the launch of Gillette's Treo, which the company calls the "first-ever assisted shaving razor."

The blade, which is designed specifically for a caregiver to use on clients or family members, is currently in testing. The company plans to distribute 10,000 razors free as part of the trial. The data they gather will help inform the final design.  

"When we spoke with our partners like [the American Society of Aging], we learned that the primary goal of family members and professional caregivers alike is to help maintain a sense of normalcy and to support lost functions — like the ability to shave oneself," Melissa Monich, Procter & Gamble's vice president of research and development, global grooming, said in a news release.

Adapting the Treo for caregiver use meant redesigning the company's traditional blade to optimize for one person shaving another.

The most drastic change is to the handle, which works "like a paintbrush" and includes a divot that operators place their fingers on for a steadier shave. The handle also contains built-in shaving gel, allowing caregivers to lather and shave in one motion.

Some caregivers plan to waiting and see if the Treo will really work as advertised.

While others are cautiously optimistic.

The company hopes the innovation results in a "dignified shaving experience" for those unable to shave themselves.

"We were struck by how important these day-to-day activities are in supporting the dignity, pride, and morale of those who need assistance," Monich said.

Soon, a few thousand people will have a chance to see if the blade delivers that boost — and a clean shave, to boot.

People interested in receiving a free razor as part of the pilot program can register here through Nov. 30, 2017.

'Merry Christmas' on YouTube.

The world must have been—mostly—good this year. Because Elton John and Ed Sheeran have teamed up to gift us all with a brand new Christmas single.

The song, aptly named “Merry Christmas,” is a perfect blend of silly and sweet that’s cheery, bright and just a touch bizarre.

Created with the holiday spirit in every way, it has whimsical snowball fights, snow angels (basically all the snow things), festive sweaters, iconic throwbacks and twinkling lights galore. Plus all profits from the tune are dedicated to two charities: the Ed Sheeran Suffolk Music Foundation and the Elton John AIDS Foundation.

I personally don’t know which is more of a highlight: Ed Sheeran channeling his inner-Mariah, performing a faux sexy dance in a leg revealing Santa outfit, or him flying through the air with a giant Frosty the Snowman … who seems to be sporting glasses similar to Elton’s. Are we meant to believe that Elton is the Snowman? This music video even has mystery.
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Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

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