Somehow this little 4-year-old girl knew what she had to do when her brother got cancer.
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Bradley Godish wound up with a particularly aggressive form of leukemia at age 4.


Bradley's on the left; his sister, Charlie, is on the right. All images via JojoTV/YouTube.


The best course of action was to get a bone marrow donor, which — in combination with chemotherapy — had the best chance of working.

Stem cell transplants are tricky. They require a match that is close enough that your body doesn't reject it but not so close that both of them harbor the same likelihood of having the disease, like identical twins.

Enter Charlotte, aka "Charlie" — his sister.

At 4 years old, she had a big question to answer. Her parents told her how sick her brother was, and they let her know she was the best (and maybe only) one who could help him. She didn't hesitate. Her answer, “Yeah, just let me know when you need me," came quickly.

Although they are twins, they are fraternal twins — which, fortunately, can give that close-enough-but-not-too-close match Bradley desperately needed.

After the medical procedure was over in early 2015, Charlie never complained of pain, and in fact, she wore her bandage as a "badge of honor." She wanted to show that she'd helped her brother.

Her donation gave him his life back.

In fact, just a week before school started, the twins were recognized as superheroes by the Chicago White Sox, getting to run the bases (in superhero capes!) and start the game with "Play ball!"


At the start of kindergarten in autumn of 2015, Bradley is doing fabulously well.

Bradley's dad, Brian, said recently:

“It became incredibly emotional to watch Bradley and Charlie board the bus the first day of school knowing that nine months ago, we had no idea if and when this day would come."

Something tells me this brother and sister will be tighter than tight all throughout their lives.

Their mother told People magazine: "We want him and Charlie to remember this time in their lives and how they were there for each other. The bond and the love they have as twins is now even stronger."

Like blood relatives, you might say.

September was pediatric cancer month.

Here's a recent clip featuring Mom, Dad, and the adorable twins from WGN9:

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