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She's helping first-graders map their route to college. Too early? Nope.

They're like arrows pointed at a target 11 years away.

Most people hope their kids will go to college.

We know that a college education can definitely help out with making some decent money in the future. But while you're sweating it over whether you should open a savings account before they're even born, kids be like:

College? I think it costs...


Um ... try again.

Higher!


Let's not take them on "The Price Is Right," OK?

They've heard about college, but they don't really get it.

What it costs. What you have to do to get there. Why you should even bother going.

Does your child know what college is? I mean, really?

First-grade teacher Kelli Rigo overheard her kids playing under the table one day. She was astounded to realize that even though she had talked about college with her kids, her daughter didn't know what it was. She "couldn't quite understand what the word 'college' meant. She thought that it was jail."

My daughter "couldn't quite understand what the word 'college' meant. She thought that it was jail."

Kelli started to think that if kids don't know what college is, how could we expect them to get there?

She started doing an annual project with her class where the kids pick a college, learn about college life, discuss why they should go there, and even fill out an application.

Isn't that pushing kids too much, too soon, too early? Nope.

No matter how much money you have, if you expect your child to go to college, they probably will do better in school. And academic success will increase their chances of earning acceptance to the school of their choice.

These kids have a bright future ahead of them, and thanks to their awesome teacher, they can already envision it.

They're motivated. They're ready. They are the class of 2030, and we all better watch out.

Be sure to check out the video to learn how much they think college should cost (Hint: They are at least 1000x wrong, but adorably so) and what they believe the best part of college will be.

An eye-opening Tumblr thread posted to Reddit shows how federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) programs designed to help disabled people actually help keep them in poverty.

Reddit user iDogeYT posted this thread that explains how people with disabilities are not allowed to have more than $2,000 to their name or the benefits they depend on are automatically shut off.

This leaves them unable to save for a rainy day, educational opportunities, or to buy a home or car.

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