popular

Woman gets dragged for calling plus-sized mannequin 'gargantuan.' Even Jameela Jamil jumped in.

This woman wrote a whole article about how a MANNEQUIN was 'unhealthy.' 😭😂😅

Woman gets dragged for calling plus-sized mannequin 'gargantuan.' Even Jameela Jamil jumped in.

In case you missed it, Nike recently revealed a new plus-size mannequin in their flagship Oxford Street store and people have a LOT of feelings about it, both good and bad.


The feelings on all ends were stoked when Telegraph writer Tanya Gold wrote a reaction piece where she made her distaste for the mannequin known in strong words that might be best discussed with her therapist.


At one point in the article, Gold's fat-phobia comes out in full force when she describes the mannequin: "An immense, gargantuan, vast. She heaves with fat. She is, in every measure, obese, and she is not readying herself for a run on her shiny Nike gear. She cannot run. She is, more likely, pre-diabetic and on her way to a hip replacement."


Needless to say, Gold's flagrant display of disgust for larger bodies received a lot of critique from exhausted consumers, plus-size influencers, and of course, actress Jameela Jamil.



People were quick to point out the irony of Gold claiming it's "unhealthy" to show a plus-size mannequin, when the mannequin is literally wearing workout clothes.




The Welsh model Callie Thorpe made an Instagram post about the exhausting and hypocritical feedback loop of fatphobia, and how in one moment people will claim to be worried about the health of plus-size people, only to quickly contradict themselves by freaking out over there being accessible work out clothes for larger bodies.

She wrote:

"I usually would write a response to this [Gold's article] with a point to prove. something defending my point of view and those of my peers saying how outdated and disgusting these views are but quite honestly what's the point? I'm that heaving with [sic] fat woman she is talking about."
"It's no wonder people are turning to extreme weight loss measures like surgery because it feels like the only way out."
"It's ludicrous that fat people are mocked, bullied and told to get to the gym and lose weight yet we are also told, we don't deserve the access to active wear. Do you see how ridiculous that is? Which goes to show It's got nothing to do with health concern and everything to do with prejudice"

The author and activist Megan Jayne Crabbe decided to respond to the trolling article with a bit of trolling herself, so she went to the store, snapped a photo with the mannequin and wrote a post about how she was shocked the "babe responsible for thousands of fatphobes on the internet" was indeed a peaceful, plastic, non-threatening mannequin.



She wrote:

"Apparently a fitness brand using mannequins above a UK size 8 is the most outrageously offensive thing that's ever happened! Or to quote some of the comments I've seen - "dangerous", "disgusting", and "promoting death". Imagine my surprise when I entered @nikelondon and the mannequin did not, in fact, try to kill me! We actually got along great and fully rocked this impromptu photoshoot."

The comedian Sofie Hagen joined in to drag Gold's article.



Jameela Jamil really went hard in her responses, urging Gold to find a nearby bin to jump in.

She also called for an official apology from Telegraph, and went on to point out how hypocritical it is to claim fat people are unhealthy while freaking out about them being sold exercise clothes.






Needless to say, a lot of people weren't happy with Gold's take, and the ones who were flocked to the comments section of the Telegraph to air their grievances with a woman-shaped piece of plastic.

This article originally appeared on SomeeCards. You can read it here.

True

It takes a special type of person to become a nurse. The job requires a combination of energy, empathy, clear mind, oftentimes a strong stomach, and a cheerful attitude. And while people typically think of nursing in a clinical setting, some nurses are driven to work with the people that feel forgotten by society.

Keep Reading Show less

Prior to baby formula, breastfeeding was the norm, but that doesn't mean it always worked.

As if the past handful of years weren't challenging enough, the U.S. is currently dealing with a baby formula crisis.

Due to a perfect storm of supply chain issues, product recalls, labor shortages and inflation, manufacturers are struggling to keep up with formula demand and retailers are rationing supplies. As a result, families that rely on formula are scrambling to ensure that their babies get the food they need.

Naturally, people are weighing in on the crisis, with some throwing out simplistic advice like, "Why don't you just do what people did before baby formula was invented and just breastfeed?"

That might seem logical, unless you understand how breastfeeding works and know a bit about infant mortality throughout human history.

Keep Reading Show less

Courtesy of Elaine Ahn

True

The energy in a hospital can sometimes feel overwhelming, whether you’re experiencing it as a patient, visitor or employee. However, there are a few one-of-a-kind individuals like Elaine Ahn, an operating room registered nurse in Diamond Bar, California, who thrive under this type of constant pressure.

Keep Reading Show less
via Pexels

Your cat knows you better than you think.

Cats are often seen as being aloof or standoffish, even with their owners. Of course, that differs based on who that cat lives with and their lifetime of experience with humans. But when compared to man’s best friend, cats usually seem less interested in those around them, regardless of species.

However, a new study out of Japan has found that cats may be paying more attention to their fellow felines and human friends than most people thought. In fact, they could be listening to human conversations.

"What we discovered is astonishing," Saho Takagi, a research fellow specializing in animal science at Azabu University in Kanagawa Prefecture, told The Asahi Shimbun. "I want people to know the truth. Felines do not appear to listen to people's conversations, but as a matter of fact, they do."

How do we know they’re listening? Because the study shows that household cats often know the names of their human and feline friends.

Keep Reading Show less

Yuri has a very important message for his co-workers.

While every person with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is different, there are some common communication traits that everyone should understand. Many with ASD process language literally and have a hard time understanding body language, social cues, exaggeration and cultural cues.

This can lead to misunderstandings that result in people with ASD appearing to be rude when it wasn't their intent. If more neurotypical people (those without ASD) better understood these communication differences, it’d be much easier for everyone to get along.

A perfect example of this problem and how to fix it was shared by Yuri, a transmasc person who goes by he/they, who posts on TikTok about having ADHD and ASD. In a post that has more than 2.3 million views, Yuri claims he was “booked for a disciplinary meeting for being a bad communicator.”

Keep Reading Show less