Jameela Jamil just called out Khloe Kardashian for promoting dangerous beauty standards.

What you see isn’t always what you get, especially on Instagram. Celebrities who post fit photos of themselves while shilling diet products did not get that way because of the diet product.

When celebrities ignore the fact they got into shape with the help of personal trainers, healthy eating, and good old fashion Photoshop, they inadvertently promote unhealthy eating habits. When Khloe Kardashian posted a photo of her bare midriff with an ad for Flat Tummy Tea meal replacement shakes, she got called out for doing just that.

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The Good Place actress and body positivity activist Jameela Jamil put Kardashian on blast, calling Kardashian irresponsible for promoting both the shake and an unhealthy standard of beauty to her 89-plus millionInstagram followers.

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"If you're too irresponsible to: a) own up to the fact that you have a personal trainer, nutritionist, probable chef, and a surgeon to achieve your aesthetic, rather than this laxative product... and b) tell them the side effects of this non-FDA approved product, that most doctors are saying isn't healthy," Jamil wrote in a comment on Kardashian's post.

Jamil pointed out that drinking FlatTummy Tea is far from the healthiest way to lose weight, listing the tea’s gnarly side effects. "Possible Flat Tummy Tea side effects are cramping, stomach pains, diarrhea and dehydration... then I guess I have to," added Jamil.

Photo by Charley Gallay/Getty Images

Umm… You get diarrhea, but you also get a flat belly? Thanks, but no thanks.

Jamil finished out her comment by asking Kardashian to do better. She’s a role model, after all.

"It's incredibly awful that this industry bullied you until you became this fixated on your appearance. That's the media's fault," she wrote. "But now please don't put that back into the world, and hurt other girls, the way you have been hurt. You're a smart woman. Be smarter than this."

This isn’t the first time Jamil called out a celebrity for promoting potentially dangerous diet products while failing to mention the help they get to look a certain way. Jamil tweeted photos of celebrities advertising diet products, with the caption, “Give us the discount codes to your nutritionists, personal chefs, personal trainers, air brushers and plastic surgeons you bloody liars.”

Celebrities are often in amazing shape, and it’s not because they drink meal replacements. Like Jamil said, it’s irresponsible to make people think buying a detox drink is all you need to do to look as good as a Kardashian. When will we see #sponcon for just feeling good about yourself the way you are?

Photo by Maxim Hopman on Unsplash

The Sam Vimes "Boots" Theory of Socioeconomic Unfairness explains one way the rich get richer.

Any time conversations about wealth and poverty come up, people inevitably start talking about boots.

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A different take on boots and building wealth, however, paints a more accurate picture of what it takes to get out of poverty.

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Katie Peters shared a day in the life of pandemic teaching and pleaded for teachers to be given grace.

Teachers are heroes under normal circumstances. During a pandemic that has upended life as we know it, they are honest-to-goodness, bona fide superheroes.

The juggling of school and COVID-19 has been incredibly challenging, creating friction between officials, administrators, teachers, unions, parents and the public at large. Everyone has different opinions about what should and shouldn't be done, which sometimes conflict with what can and cannot be done and don't always line up with what is and isn't being done, and the result is that everyone is just … done.

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Being an adult is tough.

Nothing can ever fully prepare you for being an adult. Once you leave childhood behind, the responsibilities, let-downs and setbacks come at you fast. It’s tiring and expensive, and there's no easy-to-follow roadmap for happiness and success.

A Reddit user named u/Frequent-Pilot5243 asked the online forum, “What’s an adult problem nobody prepared you for?” and there were a lot of profound answers that get to the heart of the disappointing side of being an adult.

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