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People are dyeing their hair like space, and it's awesome.

Some intentional, others by accident. All gorgeously sciencey.

People are dyeing their hair like space, and it's awesome.

Who says that space can't be glamorous?

OK, OK — no one has said that, but maybe this is a topic worth discussing.

Because ... LOOK.


Instagram photos used with permission, featuring (clockwise from lower left) @tbmhair, @skittles.senpai, @theleopardloungemach, @ghostiee.

SPACE HAIR IS A THING.

A beautiful thing. So I looked into this. There are a handful of specific space hair moments, but there are droves of beautiful hair colors that look downright galactic.

Looking at all the hair-color trends out there, I couldn't help but think, "I SEE SPACE, PEOPLE."

Here are just five of the many many beautiful colors of hair that can mean only one thing: Space hair is happening.

1. This hair might not have intended to be inspired by Charon, Pluto's moon, but can you deny the resemblance?

Image via NASA, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, and Southwest Research Institute.

A photo posted by Daryna Barykina Photography (@daryna_barykina) on

A stronger color at the roots and classy gray. Werk!

A photo posted by Marygene Rose (@marygenemua) on

Charon the moon no longer gets to say it orbits a planet due to Pluto's demotion, but still, it's lookin' good immortalized in hair.





2. And here we have the Veil Nebula of hair-colors.

A photo posted by @its_lindsay_again on

Image via NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team.

Right?!

According to NASA, "This close-up look unveils wisps of gas, which are all that remain of what was once a star 20 times more massive than our sun."

Whoa!

3. If you squint, this woman's head IS the Northern Lights.

A photo posted by Samantha Daly (@bottleblonde76) on


4. NASA just got images from the Hubble telescope of the Twin Jet Nebula, a binary star system that also goes by the name of PN M2-9. And lo, this gal is rocking it in hair form.

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA. Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

A photo posted by Samantha Daly (@bottleblonde76) on

5. Here we have an uncannily accurate representation of what NASA describes as "planetary nebula called NGC 6818, also known as the Little Gem Nebula." Also — hair!

Image by ESA/Hubble and NASA with acknowledgement to Judy Schmidt.

NASA describes it adorably:

"This colorful bubble is a planetary nebula called NGC 6818, also known as the Little Gem Nebula. It is located in the constellation of Sagittarius (The Archer), roughly 6,000 light-years away from us. The rich glow of the cloud is just over half a light-year across — humongous compared to its tiny central star — but still a little gem on a cosmic scale."
A photo posted by Dakota Driscoll (@dak42093) on

The cosmos has some really good color theory.

Space-aholic Neil deGrasse Tyson often laments that the wonder at space is disappearing from our lives.

We don't tilt our heads up in wonder at the complexities, the vastness, the coolness of space and the cosmos.

But there's space and the cosmos, re-appearing in a pretty special place ... hair salons.

Will a bunch of brightly colored hairdos help the space program or teach us enough science to explore space? Probably not.

But it just goes to show, we've still got space love in (er, on) our heads.

And that if we put our heads together (even if they're not dyed to look like nebulae), we still sometimes look up in wonder.

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