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Mom didn't have much time left. So this couple changed wedding plans. (Tissue warning!)

When Mom's days were numbered and there were just a few good ones left, this couple decided to get married with her, right in her hospice room. And, it's beautiful.

Mom didn't have much time left. So this couple changed wedding plans. (Tissue warning!)
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Ad Council + AARP

Every parent imagines a wonderful future, full of love and happiness for their children. No doubt, that's what Deneen Fendig did when she was raising her son, Jeff.


And here they are, Mom and Jeff, all grown up.

But after 12 years, his mom was losing her fight against breast cancer. She only had a few good days left.

So Jeff decided to get married. Right then.

Jeff and his fiancee got their plans together in a day. The hospice chaplain agreed to perform the ceremony. They got their wedding clothes just before the mall closed. And friends decorated the hospice room with wedding flowers, candles, and lots and lots of love.

Here's Mom on the big day, beaming. She said, "I'm pretty excited about this."

The bride.


The ceremony was short, sweet, and beautiful.

While few people imagine having a wedding next to a medical bed in a hospice facility, this wedding shows what caretaking is really about — putting the needs of those we love first, even at one of the biggest moments in your own life.

And that love was returned. Before she died 11 days after the wedding, Jeff's mom told him this:

“I may leave this plane of existence sooner rather than later, but the love isn't going anywhere. I am as certain of that as I am of anything."
— Deneen Fendig

Lots of weddings make people cry, but this one is unique. It shows what it means to truly take care of the people in our lives, even on that special day. It's worth your time.

Welp, the two skateboarding events added to the Olympics this year have wrapped up for the women's teams, and the results are historic in more ways than one.

Japan's Kokona Hiraki, age 12, just won the silver medal in women's park skateboarding, making her Japan's youngest Olympic medalist ever. Great Britain's Sky Brown, who was 12 when she qualified for the Tokyo Olympics and is now 13, won the bronze, making her Great Britain's youngest medalist ever. And those two medal wins mean that two-thirds of the six medalists in the two women's skateboarding events are age 13 or younger. (The gold and silver medalists in women's street skateboarding, Japan's Momiji Nishiya and Brazil's Rayssa Leal, are also 13.)

That's mind-blowing.

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