BXGD / Flickr and Cody Bondarchuk / Twitter

Sometimes the smallest gesture can turn your entire day around. You find a $5 bill in the pockets of your jeans. There's no traffic on the way home from work. Or by some divine intervention, you get 11 chicken McNuggets in your 10-piece box.

Of course, if you've ever had such a blessing, you know your first thought is, "Must be some sort of mistake."

But do you return the extra McNugget? Nope. You don't even feel an ounce of guilt for it. You dunk it in barbecue sauce and relish it like a gift from the gods.

A former McDonald's employee in Edmonton, Canada let the world know that sometimes an extra McNugget is not a mistake and he's become a viral hero.


Cody Bondarchuk is being hailed as the "Robin Hood of McNuggets" after admitting in a tweet on November 15 that he intentionally gave thousands of customers an extra McNuggets in the two-and-a-half years he worked for the burger giant.

His admission invoked a passionate response on Twitter.

But Bondarchuk doesn't want to be called a hero. You deserved that extra McNugget, dammit.

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Bondachuk says he's not the only McDonald's employee who had zero issue with stealing from the multi-billion dollar company and giving it to his hungry customers.

"It was something that a lot of my coworkers did as well," he told CTV News. "It was really easy to overfill them without it looking weird when it was on the delivery line, and of course there are no cameras on the kitchen line."

So he never got caught.

He admits that he must have given away around $1,600 worth of free chicken.

In just six days, his tweet received 900,000 favorites and 80,000 retweets. It's even attracted the attention of a billionaire businessman.

"I saw that Elon Musk liked it, which is very cool," he said.

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Bondarchuk hopes that his new reputation as a champion of the working man helps him with his political ambitions, to run for Edmonton City Council in the next municipal election.

"Certainly I don't want a platform just based on nuggets," he said. "But anything that gets my name out there, I'm very happy about, because a lot of those things rooted in working-class support is where the platform will go."

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