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Pop Culture

Jimmy Kimmel invites 'Popcorn Guy' to the Oscars after seeing his next-level serving skills

Jason Grosboll has been delighting moviegoers with popcorn tricks for years.

Jimmy Kimmel invites 'Popcorn Guy' to the Oscars after seeing his next-level serving skills

He loves what he does.

Jason Grosboll, a concession worker at a Cinemark theater in Corpus Christi, Texas, offers moviegoers a show before the film has even started with his hypnotic popcorn-serving skills.

Grosboll’s popcorn powers were first discovered by a moviegoer named Oscar (aka @oanderle) while seeing the latest “Avatar.” Oscar posted a video of Grosboll deftly spinning a giant popcorn bucket on his finger and tossing it up into the air with the finesse of a seasoned flair bartender, which quickly took the internet by storm and earned Grosboll the nickname “Popcorn Guy.”

The legend of Popcorn Guy is so far-reaching that Jimmy Kimmel reached out to have him on a segment of his show to give viewers a behind-the-scenes look at his popcornography.


“I’m surprised you haven’t joined the Harlem Globetrotters,” Kimmel quipped as Grosboll once again showed off his impressive process of filling, spinning and buttering his “trusty bucket.”

Watch the segment below:

Grosboll had been working at concessions for 10 years, but only started serving up popcorn tricks for the last five, after seeing a friend try to spin a bucket and fail. Bored one day, he taught himself how to do it, and perfected it until it became second nature.

“I love my job more than anything in the world right now,” he told Kimmel.

Grosboll’s enthusiasm impressed Kimmel so much that he offered him perhaps the coolest popcorn-serving job ever—at the Oscars. Kimmel, who is hosting this year, invited the “world’s greatest popcorn bucket filler ever” to the star-studded event airing on March 12, 2023, joking that he might even serve popcorn to Tom Cruise.

Of course, Grosboll said yes. Talk about never knowing where your passions may take you.

Thank you Popcorn Guy for serving up not only delicious popcorn, but some smiles and a great attitude to boot.

True

Do you ever feel like you could be doing more when it comes to making a positive impact on your community? The messaging around giving back is louder than ever this time of year, and for good reason; It is the season of giving, after all.

If you’ve ever wondered who is responsible for bringing many of the giving-back initiatives to life, it’s probably not who you’d expect. The masterminds behind these types of campaigns are project managers.

Using their talents and skills, often proven by earning certifications from the Project Management Institute (PMI), project managers are driving real change and increasing the success rate on projects that truly improve our world.

To celebrate the work that project managers are doing behind the scenes to make a difference, we spoke with two people doing more than their part to make an impact.

In his current role as a Project Management Professional (PMP)-certified project manager and environmental engineer for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Joshua Williard oversees the cleanup of some of America’s most contaminated and hazardous waste sites.

Courtesy of Joshua Williard

“Recently, I was part of a four-person diving team sent to collect contaminated sediment samples from the bottom of a river in Southeastern Virginia. We wanted to ensure a containment wall was successfully blocking the release of waste into an adjacent river,” Williard says.

Through his work, Josh drives restoration efforts to completion so contaminated land can again be used beneficially, and so future generations will not be at risk of exposure to harmful chemicals.

“I’ve been inspired by the natural world from a young age and always loved being outside. As I gained an understanding about Earth's trajectory, I realized that I wanted to be part of trying to save it and keep it for future generations.

“I learned the importance of using different management styles to address various project challenges. I saw the value in building meaningful relationships with key community members. I came to see that effective project management can make a real difference in getting things done and having on-the-ground impact,” Williard says.

In addition, Monica Chan’s career in project management has enabled her to work at the forefront of conservation efforts with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF-US). She most recently has been managing a climate change project, working with a diverse team including scientists, policy experts, data analysts, biologists, communicators, and more. The goal is to leverage grants to protect and restore mangroves, forests, and ecosystems, and drive demand in seaweed farming – all to harness nature's power to address the climate crisis.

Courtesy of Monica Chan

“As the project management lead for WWF-US, I am collaborating across the organization to build a project management framework that adapts to our diverse projects. Given that WWF's overarching objectives center on conserving nature and addressing imminent threats to the diversity of life on Earth, the stakes are exceptionally high in how we approach projects,” says Chan.

“Throughout my journey, I've discovered a deep passion for project management's ability to unite people for shared goals, contributing meaningfully to environmental conservation,” she says.

With skills learned from on-the-job experience and resources from PMI, project managers are the central point of connection for social impact campaigns, driving them forward and solving problems along the way. They are integral to bringing these projects to life, and they find support from their peers in PMI’s community.

PMI has a global network of more than 300 chapters and serves as a community for project managers – at every stage of their career. Members can share knowledge, celebrate impact, and learn together through resources, events, and other programs such as PMI’s Hours for Impact program, which encourages PMI members to volunteer their time to projects directly supporting the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals.

“By tapping into PMI's extensive network and resources, I've expanded my project management knowledge and skills, gaining insights from seasoned professionals in diverse industries, including environmental management. Exposure to different perspectives has kept me informed about industry trends, best practices, and allowed me to tailor my approach to the unique challenges of the non-profit sector,” Chan says.

“Obtaining my PMP certification has been a game-changer, propelling not only my career growth, but also reshaping my approach to daily projects, both personally and professionally,” Chan says. Research from PMI shows that a career in project management means being part of an industry on the rise, as the global economy will need 25 million new project professionals by 2030 and the median salary for project practitioners in the U.S. is $120K.

PMI’s mission is to help professionals build project management skills through online courses, networking, and other learning opportunities, help them prove their proficiency in project management through certifications, and champion the work that project professionals, like Joshua and Monica, do around the world.

For those interested in pursuing a career in project management to help make a difference, PMI’s Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) certification could be the starting point to help get your foot in the door.

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