How your food is made matters. Here’s why.
Photo from Dole
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As you sit down to eat your breakfast in the morning or grab an afternoon snack, take a minute to consider your food, how it was made, and how it got to your plate.

The fruit on your plate were grown and picked on farms, then processed, packaged and sent to the grocery store where you bought them.

Sounds simple, right?

The truth is, that process is anything but simple and at every step in the journey to your plate, harm can be caused to the people who grow it, the communities that need it, and the planet we all call home.

For example, thousands of kids live in food deserts and areas where access to affordable and nutritious food is limited. Around the world, one in three children suffer from some form of malnutrition, and yet, up to 40% of food in the United States is never eaten.


In addition, the plastic packaging used to transport and store your food is made with fossil-fuels, which emit greenhouse gases and contribute to climate change. Then, that packaging is tossed away, ending up in landfills or as litter into our environment and waterways.

It's easy to feel overwhelmed thinking about all of this, but here's the good news: some companies are working to change all of this.

They're working towards environmental sustainability, while still providing nutritious foods to everyone. One of those companies is Dole Packaged Foods.

There is a Japanese philosophy called Sampo Yoshi that states that all businesses should have a Three-Way Satisfaction: it should be beneficial to the customer, the seller and society. This is the philosophy that inspired The Dole Promise.

Dole, together with their partners, promises to work towards six goals that will make their business not only good for them, but also for the people who eat their food and the planet as a whole.

Here are the promises:

  1. By 2025, they will contribute to good nutrition for 1 billion people by helping improve education around nutrition. They'll also increase the affordability and availability of their products. This will help combat malnutrition rates and food deserts.
  2. They pledge to reach zero fruit loss on their farms by 2025 in order to combat food waste.
  3. They commit to use zero processed sugars in their products by 2025.
  4. They are moving towards eliminating fossil fuel-based packaging, like plastics, by 2025.
  5. They are working towards carbon neutrality by 2030 by using 100% renewable energy in their processing facilities and by reducing their greenhouse gas emissions.
  6. They promise to value all of their stakeholders equal opportunity and increased benefits to everyone who works for them.

But they don't stop there.

Dole will also be donating $10K each to help further the missions of youth activists who are working to combat food waste, plastic packaging, and food access, including Josh Williams who founded Joshua's Heart Foundation, the Angeletti siblings that started back2earth, and Melati Wijsen, the 19-year old founder of Bye Bye Plastic Bags.

The end game of The Dole Promise is simple: bring "sunshine for all." Not only will it mean more nutritious food for you, but their entire business will strive to do good for communities all around the world and the planet as a whole.

To learn more about Dole, the Dole Asia Holdings group of companies, and their goals for better nutrition and environmental sustainability, visit SunshineForAll.com

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

When the COVID-19 pandemic socially distanced the world and pushed off the 2020 Olympics, we knew the games weren't going to be the same. The fact that they're even happening this year is a miracle, but without spectators and the usual hustle and bustle surrounding the events, it definitely feels different.

But it's not just the games themselves that have changed. The coverage of the Olympics has changed as well, including the unexpected addition of un-expert, uncensored commentary from comedian Kevin Hart and rapper Snoop Dogg on NBC's Peacock.

In the topsy-turvy world we're currently living in, it's both a refreshing and hilarious addition to the Olympic lineup.

Just watch this clip of them narrating an equestrian event. (Language warning if you've got kiddos nearby. The first video is bleeped, but the others aren't.)

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