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'Hi, Boss. Look, My Kid Is Sick Today. Mmmhmm, Projectile Everything. Can He Be The Store Greeter?'

The folks at MomsRising.org have created a hilarious set of cartoons that show the reality for many working families: no paid sick time off. I can already hear the comments from some: "But but but businesses can't AFFORD that!" To them I say, then they can't afford to be in business. Note, because I know there will be confusion: the entire piece below was written by the author Charlie Rose. We received permission to repost here.

'Hi, Boss. Look, My Kid Is Sick Today. Mmmhmm, Projectile Everything. Can He Be The Store Greeter?'

"Great" Alternatives To Paid Sick Days

Posted by Charlie Rose


Kids are gross. Inspiring, cuddly, lovable, yes — but also: gross. I had barely heard of things like pink eye, ringworm and foot and mouth disease until I became a mom. My kid even got scarlet fever — Oregon Trail much?

All kids get sick sometime, but nothing makes a 2 a.m. vomit session worse than the additional worry that you’ll lose your job if you can’t go in to work the next day.

Unfortunately, that nightmare is a reality for far too many people in the United States. In fact, today, 40% of all workers and 80% of low-wage workers cannot earn even a single paid sick day to care for themselves or a sick kid.

Fortunately, we’ve come up with some GREAT alternatives to paid sick days. Why stay home to care for a sick little one when you can…

1. Take 'em to Congress or City Hall!

1. Take 'em to Congress or City Hall!

I especially recommend this plan for states like Florida and Pennsylvania where some legislators actually want it to be illegal for cities within the state to pass laws that guarantee sick leave.

2. Hide 'em under your desk!

2. Hide 'em under your desk!

True story! At MomsRising.org, we receive tons of stories from moms and dads across the country who’ve had to take their sick kids to work with them. And since your darling vomiting babe will likely get you sick too, you’ll have an impressive pile of tissues to hide them with! Bonus!

3. Don’t get sick. Ever.

3. Don't get sick. Ever.

If you do get sick you can break out a haz-mat suit to keep it from your kids. In fact, you should probably wear one all the time.

We all know a supportive partner can make all the difference, but since pretty much no one can afford to have a parent stay home full time, a supportive partner might end up being thrown under the “sick day bus” by having to stay home even when they can’t afford to, which brings us to idea #4….

4. Win the chance to go to work.

4. Win the chance to go to work.

If “Rock, Paper, Scissors” won’t fly, you can always try shouting “Not it!” or “Nose goes.”

You might even be lucky to have a supportive job that has emergency child care for sick kids. LOL, just kidding, but I hear Craigslist has great babysitters. If not you can always…

5. Hire a lion to babysit!

5. Hire a lion to babysit!

*If for some reason none of these horrible ideas appeal to you, there is one more thing you could try…

*If for some reason none of these horrible ideas appeal to you, there is one more thing you could try...

MomsRising is working with folks in cities across the country to organize for paid sick days — and we’re WINNING! Seven cities and one state have earned paid sick days for most workers, and dozens of other campaigns are in the works, including a campaign for a national standard! Join us in the fight for paid sick days here!

* * * * *

Charlie Rose is a fellow with MomsRising.org, a national organization with over a million members advocating for family economic security.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.